Title

Hypotonic Soaking Induced Fracture in Hexagonal Thermolysin

Presenter

Nick Wechter

Abstract

Protein crystals are classified as nanoporous materials containing large pores that introduce low weight solutes throughout the crystal. Soaking, a term that describes the introduction of protein crystals to new solutions, takes advantage of this property to apply protein crystals to various processes such as chiral separation of enantiomers, catalysis, and high resolution determination of protein structure through x-ray diffraction. My research aimed to investigate and model fracturing induced by hypotonic soaking in hexagonal thermolysin. To ensure reproducibility of results, many variables including the ambient humidity and the orientation of the crystal during soaking proved relevant. Furthermore, a time dependent aspect of hypotonic soaking fracture was identified through the use of NVH oil and a high speed camera. Ultimately a correlation between the concentration gradient of the soak and the degree of fracture was established and

modeled.

Faculty Sponsor

Douglas Juers

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology

Tracks

Physical Science

Location

Science 159

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Perry

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Apr 11th, 9:15 AM Apr 11th, 9:30 AM

Hypotonic Soaking Induced Fracture in Hexagonal Thermolysin

Science 159

Protein crystals are classified as nanoporous materials containing large pores that introduce low weight solutes throughout the crystal. Soaking, a term that describes the introduction of protein crystals to new solutions, takes advantage of this property to apply protein crystals to various processes such as chiral separation of enantiomers, catalysis, and high resolution determination of protein structure through x-ray diffraction. My research aimed to investigate and model fracturing induced by hypotonic soaking in hexagonal thermolysin. To ensure reproducibility of results, many variables including the ambient humidity and the orientation of the crystal during soaking proved relevant. Furthermore, a time dependent aspect of hypotonic soaking fracture was identified through the use of NVH oil and a high speed camera. Ultimately a correlation between the concentration gradient of the soak and the degree of fracture was established and

modeled.