Title

Abundance Estimations of Ixodid Ticks on Boran Cattle and Somali Sheep in Northern Tanzania

Presenter

Troy Warwick

Abstract

Reduction of numbers of ticks and tick-borne diseases has been identified as the most pressing veterinary health concern in continental Africa. The loss of livestock to tick-borne illness is especially devastating in resource-poor pastoral communities. In areas where wild animals and livestock coexist, tick abundances are often very high, and therefore the development of effective treatment plans is necessary. Assessments of tick abundance on live animals are required for management or research purposes, however tick counts on the entire body are time consuming, costly, and stressful to the animal. Here we analyzed Boran cattle and Somali sheep in Northern Tanzania and developed linear regression models wherein only the ticks on one body part need to be counted in order to estimate total-body abundance. These models aid in drastically reducing data collection time and are essential in developing tick management strategies in East Africa.

Faculty Sponsor

Susanne Altermann

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biology

Tracks

Animal Kingdom

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Location

Science 100

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Abundance Estimations of Ixodid Ticks on Boran Cattle and Somali Sheep in Northern Tanzania

Science 100

Reduction of numbers of ticks and tick-borne diseases has been identified as the most pressing veterinary health concern in continental Africa. The loss of livestock to tick-borne illness is especially devastating in resource-poor pastoral communities. In areas where wild animals and livestock coexist, tick abundances are often very high, and therefore the development of effective treatment plans is necessary. Assessments of tick abundance on live animals are required for management or research purposes, however tick counts on the entire body are time consuming, costly, and stressful to the animal. Here we analyzed Boran cattle and Somali sheep in Northern Tanzania and developed linear regression models wherein only the ticks on one body part need to be counted in order to estimate total-body abundance. These models aid in drastically reducing data collection time and are essential in developing tick management strategies in East Africa.

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