Title

Affect and the Interaction Between Openness and Reappraisal

Abstract

Chronic negative affect correlates negatively with quality of life, whereas individual differences in regulating negative affect predict physical and psychological health. The cognitive-affective reappraisal of negative emotion, which involves positive reflections of negative stressors, has received much attention in research as a strategy that promotes psychological adjustment. Relatively little research addresses the question of whether personality traits moderate the effectiveness of emotion regulation strategies. Because openness to experience entails a preference for experiencing strong emotions, we theorize that this trait moderates the short-term effects of reappraisal on positive and negative affect. In our study, we asked participants to recall a sad memory and asked them, randomly, to write about it with or without reappraisal. We sought to bring closer together past research on personality and emotion regulation in the hope that our research will further illuminate the conditions in which certain emotion regulation strategies are most effective

Faculty Sponsor

Pavel Blagov

Sponsor Department/Programs

Psychology

Tracks

Body and Mind

Location

Olin 157

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:15 AM

Affect and the Interaction Between Openness and Reappraisal

Olin 157

Chronic negative affect correlates negatively with quality of life, whereas individual differences in regulating negative affect predict physical and psychological health. The cognitive-affective reappraisal of negative emotion, which involves positive reflections of negative stressors, has received much attention in research as a strategy that promotes psychological adjustment. Relatively little research addresses the question of whether personality traits moderate the effectiveness of emotion regulation strategies. Because openness to experience entails a preference for experiencing strong emotions, we theorize that this trait moderates the short-term effects of reappraisal on positive and negative affect. In our study, we asked participants to recall a sad memory and asked them, randomly, to write about it with or without reappraisal. We sought to bring closer together past research on personality and emotion regulation in the hope that our research will further illuminate the conditions in which certain emotion regulation strategies are most effective