Title

Methamphetamine in the Aggravation of Pulmonary Hypertension

Presenter

Audrey Inglis

Abstract

Little is currently known about the pathology of pulmonary hypertension, and treatment options are limited, with lung transplant being the only treatment option in severe cases. Amphetamines have been shown to increase the risk of developing pulmonary hypertension, and the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway has been identified as a potential target to further understand how the DNA damage seen in pulmonary hypertension is exaggerated by amphetamines. We used western blot analysis, immunofluorescent imaging, and qPCR to examine the effects of amphetamine and hypoxia treatments on pulmonary arterial endothelial cells. This approach allowed us to determine how two HIF proteins are affected by hypoxia and amphetamines, and to explore how dysregulation of the HIF pathway may lead to pulmonary hypertension. We found that amphetamine is likely associated with HIF dysregulation, which leads to an imbalance of HIF-regulated genes. This imbalance may underlie the DNA damage seen in pulmonary hypertension.

Faculty Sponsor

Hilary Lease

Sponsor Department/Programs

Psychology

Tracks

Body and Mind

Terms of Use

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Location

Olin 157

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 11th, 10:45 AM Apr 11th, 11:00 AM

Methamphetamine in the Aggravation of Pulmonary Hypertension

Olin 157

Little is currently known about the pathology of pulmonary hypertension, and treatment options are limited, with lung transplant being the only treatment option in severe cases. Amphetamines have been shown to increase the risk of developing pulmonary hypertension, and the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway has been identified as a potential target to further understand how the DNA damage seen in pulmonary hypertension is exaggerated by amphetamines. We used western blot analysis, immunofluorescent imaging, and qPCR to examine the effects of amphetamine and hypoxia treatments on pulmonary arterial endothelial cells. This approach allowed us to determine how two HIF proteins are affected by hypoxia and amphetamines, and to explore how dysregulation of the HIF pathway may lead to pulmonary hypertension. We found that amphetamine is likely associated with HIF dysregulation, which leads to an imbalance of HIF-regulated genes. This imbalance may underlie the DNA damage seen in pulmonary hypertension.

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