Title

The Protein of IRGQ's Role in Cancer Metastasis

Presenter

Mackinzie Stanley

Abstract

Autophagy is traditionally thought of as a cellular recycling pathway used to regularly turn-over organelles and proteins found within the cell, as well as to eliminate dysfunctional organelles like mitochondria. The autophagy pathway has recently been shown to also function as a secretion pathway, raising the possibility for a role in signaling between cells. Recent studies suggest that the autophagy-dependent secretion pathway may play an important role in cancer metastasis. This raises exciting new possibilities for anti-cancer drugs targeting these secreted proteins or the process that secretes them. However, the autophagy secretion pathway is still poorly understood. My summer research project at the Debnath Lab at UCSF was to investigate a specific protein, IRGQ, that was screened as a possible player in the autophagy secretion pathway. IRGQ was found to be secreted in an autophagy-dependent manner and was found to interact with previously-known players in the autophagy pathway.

Faculty Sponsor

Britney Moss

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology

Tracks

Cells and Sickness

Location

Science 100

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

SFS: Tanzania Wildlife Management Studies

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Apr 11th, 10:00 AM Apr 11th, 10:15 AM

The Protein of IRGQ's Role in Cancer Metastasis

Science 100

Autophagy is traditionally thought of as a cellular recycling pathway used to regularly turn-over organelles and proteins found within the cell, as well as to eliminate dysfunctional organelles like mitochondria. The autophagy pathway has recently been shown to also function as a secretion pathway, raising the possibility for a role in signaling between cells. Recent studies suggest that the autophagy-dependent secretion pathway may play an important role in cancer metastasis. This raises exciting new possibilities for anti-cancer drugs targeting these secreted proteins or the process that secretes them. However, the autophagy secretion pathway is still poorly understood. My summer research project at the Debnath Lab at UCSF was to investigate a specific protein, IRGQ, that was screened as a possible player in the autophagy secretion pathway. IRGQ was found to be secreted in an autophagy-dependent manner and was found to interact with previously-known players in the autophagy pathway.