Title

Effect of Age on Second-Language Proficiency

Abstract

Our presentation focuses on the effectiveness of second-language learning at a young age compared with formal language instruction in higher education. Participants in our research include children ages 7-9 who have been enrolled in a bilingual or dual language program at their school for three or more years and students (ages 18-25) who have completed at least two semesters of a second language exclusively at a liberal arts college. Participants are timed as they name a series of simple pictures in English and in their second language as quickly as they can. We compare response speed between the two ages for each language as well as between English and the second language within each age group. Based on previous research, we predict the younger sample is faster than the college students at rapid naming in the second language, at least relative to their rapid naming in English.

Faculty Sponsor

Emily Bushnell

Sponsor Department/Programs

Psychology

Tracks

Developmental Psychology

Location

Olin 157

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 11th, 9:15 AM Apr 11th, 9:30 AM

Effect of Age on Second-Language Proficiency

Olin 157

Our presentation focuses on the effectiveness of second-language learning at a young age compared with formal language instruction in higher education. Participants in our research include children ages 7-9 who have been enrolled in a bilingual or dual language program at their school for three or more years and students (ages 18-25) who have completed at least two semesters of a second language exclusively at a liberal arts college. Participants are timed as they name a series of simple pictures in English and in their second language as quickly as they can. We compare response speed between the two ages for each language as well as between English and the second language within each age group. Based on previous research, we predict the younger sample is faster than the college students at rapid naming in the second language, at least relative to their rapid naming in English.