Title

Game On: Language, Gender and Exclusivity in Sports Rhetoric

Presenter

Emma Neslund

Abstract

Recent discourse about sports politics focuses on inequalities among men and women: pay discrepancies, media coverage and inconsistencies in access to resources. I examine the way in which language in sports commentary reveals a society grappling with the growing participation of women in sports traditionally defined by masculine values. This results in an otherness, a position on the periphery, for women athletes. I examine language used by commentators to describe men and women competing in tennis and basketball. Previous studies prescribe purposeful labeling of gender markers in sports to correct the dialect of men’s sports as the “original” and women’s sport as the “other.” I find this labeling practice equally problematic, forcing a categorization and identification that automatically excludes. Is all-inclusivity possible? Let’s play ball.

Faculty Sponsor

Zahi Zalloua

Sponsor Department/Programs

Gender Studies

Tracks

Gender Inequities

Terms of Use

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Location

Reid G02

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 19th, 3:45 PM Apr 19th, 4:00 PM

Game On: Language, Gender and Exclusivity in Sports Rhetoric

Reid G02

Recent discourse about sports politics focuses on inequalities among men and women: pay discrepancies, media coverage and inconsistencies in access to resources. I examine the way in which language in sports commentary reveals a society grappling with the growing participation of women in sports traditionally defined by masculine values. This results in an otherness, a position on the periphery, for women athletes. I examine language used by commentators to describe men and women competing in tennis and basketball. Previous studies prescribe purposeful labeling of gender markers in sports to correct the dialect of men’s sports as the “original” and women’s sport as the “other.” I find this labeling practice equally problematic, forcing a categorization and identification that automatically excludes. Is all-inclusivity possible? Let’s play ball.

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