Title

Survival in Nigeria: Understanding Corruption outside the Framework of Western Representation

Presenter

Annie Boyenneh

Abstract

Like many African nations, Nigeria has fallen victim to a Western narrative that characterizes the country as one of the most corrupt in the world. Nigeria has consistently been cited among countries with the worst governance, the least government transparency and the highest level of mistrust and corruption in the public sector. A U.S. House of Representatives hearing on Africa in 2006 concluded that Nigeria has a reputation for corruption. This Western view often dismisses the way in which corrupt practices in Nigeria have become a necessary social norm, a method of survival in the society. My presentation examines these “corrupt” social norms by drawing out colonial influences tied to contemporary corruption. I also show how corruption functions as a survival mechanism in Nigerian society.

Faculty Sponsor

Shampa Biswas

Sponsor Department/Programs

Politics

Tracks

Politics of Power

Terms of Use

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Location

Olin 130

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 19th, 4:00 PM Apr 19th, 4:15 PM

Survival in Nigeria: Understanding Corruption outside the Framework of Western Representation

Olin 130

Like many African nations, Nigeria has fallen victim to a Western narrative that characterizes the country as one of the most corrupt in the world. Nigeria has consistently been cited among countries with the worst governance, the least government transparency and the highest level of mistrust and corruption in the public sector. A U.S. House of Representatives hearing on Africa in 2006 concluded that Nigeria has a reputation for corruption. This Western view often dismisses the way in which corrupt practices in Nigeria have become a necessary social norm, a method of survival in the society. My presentation examines these “corrupt” social norms by drawing out colonial influences tied to contemporary corruption. I also show how corruption functions as a survival mechanism in Nigerian society.

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