Title

Physiological Response of Mimulus luteus and Mimulus cupreus to Elevated Levels of CO2

Presenter

Jeremy Nolan

Abstract

Plants confront a variety of environmental stressors on a daily basis, and must develop effective physiological and ecological responses in order to successfully survive and propagate. In order to test the ability of plants to respond to elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, we germinated and propagated Mimulus luteus and Mimulus cupreus (two emerging model plant species) in normal (410ppm) and high (840ppm) CO2 conditions. We then examined seven distinct physiological and phenotypic traits and performed a principal components analysis (PCA) in order to determine how these two species respond to an enriched CO2 environment. We found that CO2 treatment (and in some cases species) had a significant, negative effect on physiological and phenotypic traits. We believe these findings are the result of restricted cellular respiration.

Faculty Sponsor

Arielle Cooley

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biology

Tracks

Poster Session

Terms of Use

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

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Physiological Response of Mimulus luteus and Mimulus cupreus to Elevated Levels of CO2

Cordiner Hall

Plants confront a variety of environmental stressors on a daily basis, and must develop effective physiological and ecological responses in order to successfully survive and propagate. In order to test the ability of plants to respond to elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, we germinated and propagated Mimulus luteus and Mimulus cupreus (two emerging model plant species) in normal (410ppm) and high (840ppm) CO2 conditions. We then examined seven distinct physiological and phenotypic traits and performed a principal components analysis (PCA) in order to determine how these two species respond to an enriched CO2 environment. We found that CO2 treatment (and in some cases species) had a significant, negative effect on physiological and phenotypic traits. We believe these findings are the result of restricted cellular respiration.

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