Presenter

Spencer Mueller

Abstract

In a study-abroad course titled “Independent Study: Qualitative Research Psychology” at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad, I observed how a variety of games facilitated interaction in Danish cafés and bars. My research is based on the theory of legitimate peripheral participation (Lave and Wenger, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel and Turner, 1986). In five separate locations I used grounded theory (Strauss and Corbin, 1998) to elucidate underlying systematic relationships. Through my research, I conclude that the cultures in the cafés, bars, restaurants and game cafés have unique pathways to integrate individuals who do not have intimate knowledge of the community’s explicit and implicit social rules. I also note that games strengthen relationships between self-identified “players” and do not have an effect on “non-players.” My findings provide observational evidence about the role that games play in building a community.

Faculty Sponsor

Matthew Prull

Sponsor Department/Programs

Psychology

Tracks

Poster Session

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 19th, 1:00 PM Apr 19th, 2:00 PM

Games and Social Identity in Danish Cafes

Cordiner Hall

In a study-abroad course titled “Independent Study: Qualitative Research Psychology” at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad, I observed how a variety of games facilitated interaction in Danish cafés and bars. My research is based on the theory of legitimate peripheral participation (Lave and Wenger, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel and Turner, 1986). In five separate locations I used grounded theory (Strauss and Corbin, 1998) to elucidate underlying systematic relationships. Through my research, I conclude that the cultures in the cafés, bars, restaurants and game cafés have unique pathways to integrate individuals who do not have intimate knowledge of the community’s explicit and implicit social rules. I also note that games strengthen relationships between self-identified “players” and do not have an effect on “non-players.” My findings provide observational evidence about the role that games play in building a community.

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