Title

Role of Floral Scent Compounds in Host-Flower Recognition by the Solitary Bee Chelostoma florisomne

Presenter

Ziggy Lanman

Abstract

Buttercup flowers are the only source of food for the solitary bee ,i>Chelostoma florisomne. Different scent chemicals in the flowers have been found to elicit attraction (landings) and recognition (feeding responses) by foraging-experienced females. The dominant petal volatile, trans-ß-ocimene, attracts the bees, whereas the combination of trans-ß-ocimene with two dominant pollen volatiles, protoanemonin and a-farnesene, elicits recognition. To identify which chemicals are used by the bees to recognize their host flower, over 80 bees were tested in a two-way choice behavioral experiment. Bees were offered an experimental scent solution (trans- ß-ocimene + protoanemonin) and a control solution (solvent only), and their behavioral responses (landings, feedings) were recorded. Surprisingly, bees showed no discrimination between samples. This suggests that these scent compounds presented together elicit different responses than when they are combined with a-farnesene. Additional experiments are needed to identify how bees use these floral scent chemicals in locating and recognizing host flowers.

Faculty Sponsor

Heidi Dobson

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biology

Tracks

Poster Session

Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

The Perry Grant

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Apr 19th, 1:00 PM Apr 19th, 2:00 PM

Role of Floral Scent Compounds in Host-Flower Recognition by the Solitary Bee Chelostoma florisomne

Cordiner Hall

Buttercup flowers are the only source of food for the solitary bee ,i>Chelostoma florisomne. Different scent chemicals in the flowers have been found to elicit attraction (landings) and recognition (feeding responses) by foraging-experienced females. The dominant petal volatile, trans-ß-ocimene, attracts the bees, whereas the combination of trans-ß-ocimene with two dominant pollen volatiles, protoanemonin and a-farnesene, elicits recognition. To identify which chemicals are used by the bees to recognize their host flower, over 80 bees were tested in a two-way choice behavioral experiment. Bees were offered an experimental scent solution (trans- ß-ocimene + protoanemonin) and a control solution (solvent only), and their behavioral responses (landings, feedings) were recorded. Surprisingly, bees showed no discrimination between samples. This suggests that these scent compounds presented together elicit different responses than when they are combined with a-farnesene. Additional experiments are needed to identify how bees use these floral scent chemicals in locating and recognizing host flowers.