Title

Synthesis of a Model Complex for Toxic Carbon Monoxide Conversion

Presenter

Chris Williams

Abstract

Soil bacteria can convert approximately millions of tons of toxic carbon monoxide (CO) into non-toxic carbon dioxide (CO2) annually using the enzyme CO dehydrogenase (CODH). During CO conversion, CODH also splits water molecules into protons and electrons which are the primary source for hydrogen fuel production. We are focusing on a particular CODH enzyme found in aerobic bacteria Oligotropha carboxidovorans due to its unique molybdenum-copper reaction center not seen in other forms of CODH. Our goal is to synthesize a chemical compound that mimics the function of the CODH enzyme, which has implications in the fields of alternative fuels and environmental remediation. Currently we have designed multiple compounds that fit the physical specifications of the enzyme and we are in the process of synthesizing these complexes. If successful, the CO conversion activity of these complexes will be investigated. We plan to further modify these complexes to improve catalytic efficiency.

Faculty Sponsor

Dalia Rokhsana

Sponsor Department/Programs

Chemistry

Tracks

Poster Session

Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 19th, 1:00 PM Apr 19th, 2:00 PM

Synthesis of a Model Complex for Toxic Carbon Monoxide Conversion

Cordiner Hall

Soil bacteria can convert approximately millions of tons of toxic carbon monoxide (CO) into non-toxic carbon dioxide (CO2) annually using the enzyme CO dehydrogenase (CODH). During CO conversion, CODH also splits water molecules into protons and electrons which are the primary source for hydrogen fuel production. We are focusing on a particular CODH enzyme found in aerobic bacteria Oligotropha carboxidovorans due to its unique molybdenum-copper reaction center not seen in other forms of CODH. Our goal is to synthesize a chemical compound that mimics the function of the CODH enzyme, which has implications in the fields of alternative fuels and environmental remediation. Currently we have designed multiple compounds that fit the physical specifications of the enzyme and we are in the process of synthesizing these complexes. If successful, the CO conversion activity of these complexes will be investigated. We plan to further modify these complexes to improve catalytic efficiency.