Title

Combined-Eye-and-Head Gaze (CEHG) Shift Testing for Detection of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

Presenter

Brooke Bessen

Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, or concussion), can result in cognitive, physical, and behavioral symptoms that substantially affect one’s quality of life. mTBI is highly prevalent in the US, with many cases occurring through high-impact sport. However, an estimated 70 to 90% of concussions go undiagnosed. Considering the possible long-term effects caused by repetitive concussion, it is crucial that we find a dependable and accessible diagnostic tool for mTBI. Our primary objective was to determine if combined-eye-and-head gaze (CEHG) shift testing could detect mTBI in student athletes subjected to mild head injury. We used an eye tracker to measure CEHG shifts in varsity soccer players during three different visual tracking paradigms. Qualitative intrasubject comparisons in student athletes have indicated deficits in CEHG shifts following concussion. Quantitative analyses of gaze shift metrics (e.g., velocity) may demonstrate differences related to mTBI, supporting the use of CEHG examination to detect concussion.

Faculty Sponsor

Thomas Knight

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biology

Tracks

Poster Session

Terms of Use

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

This research was funded by the Perry Summer Research Award

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Apr 19th, 1:00 PM Apr 19th, 2:00 PM

Combined-Eye-and-Head Gaze (CEHG) Shift Testing for Detection of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

Cordiner Hall

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, or concussion), can result in cognitive, physical, and behavioral symptoms that substantially affect one’s quality of life. mTBI is highly prevalent in the US, with many cases occurring through high-impact sport. However, an estimated 70 to 90% of concussions go undiagnosed. Considering the possible long-term effects caused by repetitive concussion, it is crucial that we find a dependable and accessible diagnostic tool for mTBI. Our primary objective was to determine if combined-eye-and-head gaze (CEHG) shift testing could detect mTBI in student athletes subjected to mild head injury. We used an eye tracker to measure CEHG shifts in varsity soccer players during three different visual tracking paradigms. Qualitative intrasubject comparisons in student athletes have indicated deficits in CEHG shifts following concussion. Quantitative analyses of gaze shift metrics (e.g., velocity) may demonstrate differences related to mTBI, supporting the use of CEHG examination to detect concussion.

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