Title

Predictability of ER Radiology Results, and Reasons for Ordering Negative Studies

Presenter

Jennifer Tornay

Abstract

Current usage of radiological studies, such as X-rays and CT scans, has recently come under scrutiny. Because of the consequences associated with the overuse of such tests, including an increased risk of cancer due to repetitive exposure to radiation and elevated healthcare costs, it’s essential to establish if these tests are being used effectively. A research study was conducted to assess if the use of these scans in the emergency room is appropriate. A survey evaluated physicians’ ability to predict the outcomes of scans they ordered. Their reasoning for ordering tests that they predicted to be negative for pathology was also assessed, to identify the driving factors behind ordering tests with a low possibility of yielding significant findings. We found that physicians were often able to predict when a scan wouldn’t show any significant pathology, but frequently anticipated the presence of pathological findings when, in fact, there were none.

Faculty Sponsor

Matthew Crook

Sponsor Department/Programs

Biology

Tracks

Poster Session

Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

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Apr 19th, 1:00 PM Apr 19th, 2:00 PM

Predictability of ER Radiology Results, and Reasons for Ordering Negative Studies

Cordiner Hall

Current usage of radiological studies, such as X-rays and CT scans, has recently come under scrutiny. Because of the consequences associated with the overuse of such tests, including an increased risk of cancer due to repetitive exposure to radiation and elevated healthcare costs, it’s essential to establish if these tests are being used effectively. A research study was conducted to assess if the use of these scans in the emergency room is appropriate. A survey evaluated physicians’ ability to predict the outcomes of scans they ordered. Their reasoning for ordering tests that they predicted to be negative for pathology was also assessed, to identify the driving factors behind ordering tests with a low possibility of yielding significant findings. We found that physicians were often able to predict when a scan wouldn’t show any significant pathology, but frequently anticipated the presence of pathological findings when, in fact, there were none.