Title

Framing the Grievable/Ungrievable American Citizen: Visual Representations on Behalf of Katrina Event Survivors

Abstract

My presentation attempts to make sense of the contested public memory of Hurricane Katrina by analyzing "Telling Their Stories," a curation of 53 news images and an introductory text that convey a specific narrative of the event. The photos are coded into categories of apocalyptic imagery, hypervisibility, citizenship, militarization and class voyeurism to highlight patterns of subjectivity certain bodies are placed within. Judith Butler’s theories of precarity and framing, Nicole Fleetwood’s hypervisibility and iconicity and Wendy Brown’s neoliberalism examine the rhetorical significance of these photos and the public memory they provide for a mediated audience. I argue that the photo collection further embeds iconic visual frames of black precarity and white exceptionalism into the event’s memory through neoliberal rationality.

Faculty Sponsor

Heather Hayes, Lydia McDermott

Tracks

Identity, Ethics and Memory

Terms of Use

ARMINDA Terms of Use

Location

Reid G02

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Framing the Grievable/Ungrievable American Citizen: Visual Representations on Behalf of Katrina Event Survivors

Reid G02

My presentation attempts to make sense of the contested public memory of Hurricane Katrina by analyzing "Telling Their Stories," a curation of 53 news images and an introductory text that convey a specific narrative of the event. The photos are coded into categories of apocalyptic imagery, hypervisibility, citizenship, militarization and class voyeurism to highlight patterns of subjectivity certain bodies are placed within. Judith Butler’s theories of precarity and framing, Nicole Fleetwood’s hypervisibility and iconicity and Wendy Brown’s neoliberalism examine the rhetorical significance of these photos and the public memory they provide for a mediated audience. I argue that the photo collection further embeds iconic visual frames of black precarity and white exceptionalism into the event’s memory through neoliberal rationality.

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Rights Statement

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