Title

To Bee or Not to Bee: The Potential for Beehive Fences as a Crop Protection Method in Northern Tanzania

Abstract

As human development encroaches on East Africa’s natural lands, conflict between wild animals and humans increases. This conflict severely reduces the quality of life for both populations. Specifically, human-elephant conflict poses a serious threat to subsistence farmers and migrating elephants in northern Tanzania. My presentation investigates the potential effectiveness of beehive fencing in reducing human-elephant conflict. Through interviews with villagers near Ngorongoro Conservation Area, I found that nearly two-thirds of respondents are willing to try beehive fences despite concerns about lack of efficacy and potential harm from bee stings to children and livestock. To assess the effectiveness of beehive fencing in this region, I recorded elephant-inflicted damage on trees within Manyara Ranch. I observed that sites with beehives had less tree damage than sites without beehives, lending legitimacy to beehive fences as a mitigation method.

Faculty Sponsor

Susanne Altermann

Tracks

Animal Behavior

Terms of Use

ARMINDA Terms of Use

Location

Science 100

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

The School for Field Studies, Wildlife Management Studies, Tanzania

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To Bee or Not to Bee: The Potential for Beehive Fences as a Crop Protection Method in Northern Tanzania

Science 100

As human development encroaches on East Africa’s natural lands, conflict between wild animals and humans increases. This conflict severely reduces the quality of life for both populations. Specifically, human-elephant conflict poses a serious threat to subsistence farmers and migrating elephants in northern Tanzania. My presentation investigates the potential effectiveness of beehive fencing in reducing human-elephant conflict. Through interviews with villagers near Ngorongoro Conservation Area, I found that nearly two-thirds of respondents are willing to try beehive fences despite concerns about lack of efficacy and potential harm from bee stings to children and livestock. To assess the effectiveness of beehive fencing in this region, I recorded elephant-inflicted damage on trees within Manyara Ranch. I observed that sites with beehives had less tree damage than sites without beehives, lending legitimacy to beehive fences as a mitigation method.

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