Title

Is It a Kite if It Doesn't Fly?

Abstract

My presentation attempts a critical discussion about the new Jacob Hashimoto artwork in Penrose Library titled “When Nothing Ends, Nothing Remains.” As iinternational popularity increases for Hashimoto, more businesses (including Whitman) are asking the artist for permanent art pieces to decorate their facilities. However, Hashimoto’s signature kites are mostly made of ephemeral materials such as rice paper, bamboo and string. To meet the requirements of permanent installations, Hashimoto has begun using resin, aluminum and stainless steel instead of traditional kite-making materials. I argue that this shift from functional kites to durable "kite-like" objects undermines the meaning Hashimoto associates with the kites and the process of kite-making, and thus signifies his shift from artist to businessman. Hashimoto’s career trajectory mirrors that of other internationally famous artists whose art is initially imbued with personal meaning but, with success, becomes an aesthetic brand to be flexibly deployed in the art market.

Faculty Sponsor

Lisa Uddin

Tracks

Art Theory and Critique

Terms of Use

ARMINDA Terms of Use

Location

Olin 129

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 11th, 10:00 AM Apr 11th, 10:15 AM

Is It a Kite if It Doesn't Fly?

Olin 129

My presentation attempts a critical discussion about the new Jacob Hashimoto artwork in Penrose Library titled “When Nothing Ends, Nothing Remains.” As iinternational popularity increases for Hashimoto, more businesses (including Whitman) are asking the artist for permanent art pieces to decorate their facilities. However, Hashimoto’s signature kites are mostly made of ephemeral materials such as rice paper, bamboo and string. To meet the requirements of permanent installations, Hashimoto has begun using resin, aluminum and stainless steel instead of traditional kite-making materials. I argue that this shift from functional kites to durable "kite-like" objects undermines the meaning Hashimoto associates with the kites and the process of kite-making, and thus signifies his shift from artist to businessman. Hashimoto’s career trajectory mirrors that of other internationally famous artists whose art is initially imbued with personal meaning but, with success, becomes an aesthetic brand to be flexibly deployed in the art market.

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