Title

Play for Success: An Intervention to Boost Problem-solving in Low-Income Infants

Abstract

There is a significant achievement gap between low socio-economic status (SES) and high SES children. Precursors to this gap can be seen by 6 months of age; low-SES infants demonstrate less object exploration, which is linked to delayed problem-solving. Problem-solving, otherwise known as goal-setting, is a critical component to executive functioning (EF), another criteria in which low-SES infants show deficits. These findings are especially concerning because problem-solving is a predictor for later academic achievement. In our study, we implement an intervention called Play for Success to boost object exploration and problem-solving, in the hope of minimizing gaps in early cognitive development. Preliminary findings from 16 babies indicate that this intervention may be an effective way to promote problem-solving for low-income infants.

Faculty Sponsor

Melissa Clearfield

Tracks

Culture and Care

Terms of Use

ARMINDA Terms of Use

Location

Maxey 104

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Hemera Foundation

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Play for Success: An Intervention to Boost Problem-solving in Low-Income Infants

Maxey 104

There is a significant achievement gap between low socio-economic status (SES) and high SES children. Precursors to this gap can be seen by 6 months of age; low-SES infants demonstrate less object exploration, which is linked to delayed problem-solving. Problem-solving, otherwise known as goal-setting, is a critical component to executive functioning (EF), another criteria in which low-SES infants show deficits. These findings are especially concerning because problem-solving is a predictor for later academic achievement. In our study, we implement an intervention called Play for Success to boost object exploration and problem-solving, in the hope of minimizing gaps in early cognitive development. Preliminary findings from 16 babies indicate that this intervention may be an effective way to promote problem-solving for low-income infants.

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