Title

The Tritone Paradox and the Simon Effect: A Study of Pitch Perception

Abstract

Many people are familiar with ambiguous images, such as an image that may be seen as either a duck or a rabbit. Perception of these ambiguous visual stimuli can often be manipulated. It is unclear if this is also the case for ambiguous aural stimuli. Our study considered the tritone paradox, an illusion of auditory perception, in which a pair of notes can be interpreted as either ascending or descending. We hypothesized that the listener's interpretation of the tritone could be influenced based on whether the immediately preceding tone pair was ascending or descending, and whether the response was congruent with the presentation of the tone pair. The capability, or lack thereof, to manipulate perception of a tritone has important implications for current theories of pitch perception, as well as for the study of ambiguous auditory stimuli.

Faculty Sponsor

Wally Herbranson

Tracks

Doors of Perception

Terms of Use

ARMINDA Terms of Use

Location

Reid G02

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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The Tritone Paradox and the Simon Effect: A Study of Pitch Perception

Reid G02

Many people are familiar with ambiguous images, such as an image that may be seen as either a duck or a rabbit. Perception of these ambiguous visual stimuli can often be manipulated. It is unclear if this is also the case for ambiguous aural stimuli. Our study considered the tritone paradox, an illusion of auditory perception, in which a pair of notes can be interpreted as either ascending or descending. We hypothesized that the listener's interpretation of the tritone could be influenced based on whether the immediately preceding tone pair was ascending or descending, and whether the response was congruent with the presentation of the tone pair. The capability, or lack thereof, to manipulate perception of a tritone has important implications for current theories of pitch perception, as well as for the study of ambiguous auditory stimuli.

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