Title

Uncovering the Genetic Basis of Floral Pigmentation in a Species of Chilean Mimulus

Abstract

Anthocyanins are red and blue floral pigments that provide plants protection against ultraviolet radiation and also attract pollinators. Interestingly, multiple species of Mimulus native to central Chile have independently gained these anthocyanins, one of these species being Mimulus luteus variety variegatus. This system presents a natural comparative study to determine the genetic and molecular basis of how this novel trait evolved. Previous research has identified a transcription factor gene, called Myb5, as the candidate gene likely to be responsible for the gain of anthocyanins in M. l. variegatus. My research involved creating transgenic constructs that could then be used to definitively determine whether Myb5 is the gene responsible for activating anthocyanins in M. l. variegatus. In the future, these constructs will be used to experimentally alter Myb5 expression in plants with and without floral anthocyanins, yielding new insights into how novel traits evolve.

Faculty Sponsor

Arielle Cooley

Tracks

poster

Terms of Use

If you have questions about permitted uses of this content, please contact the ARMINDA administrator

Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Perry Summer Research Award

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 2:00 PM

Uncovering the Genetic Basis of Floral Pigmentation in a Species of Chilean Mimulus

Cordiner Hall

Anthocyanins are red and blue floral pigments that provide plants protection against ultraviolet radiation and also attract pollinators. Interestingly, multiple species of Mimulus native to central Chile have independently gained these anthocyanins, one of these species being Mimulus luteus variety variegatus. This system presents a natural comparative study to determine the genetic and molecular basis of how this novel trait evolved. Previous research has identified a transcription factor gene, called Myb5, as the candidate gene likely to be responsible for the gain of anthocyanins in M. l. variegatus. My research involved creating transgenic constructs that could then be used to definitively determine whether Myb5 is the gene responsible for activating anthocyanins in M. l. variegatus. In the future, these constructs will be used to experimentally alter Myb5 expression in plants with and without floral anthocyanins, yielding new insights into how novel traits evolve.

Rights Statement

Rights Statement

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).