Title

Deficits in Anti-Saccade Eye Movement Metrics Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Female Athletes

Abstract

Sport-related concussion continues to be a public health concern in the U.S. Millions of Americans sustain concussions playing sports each year, but correctly diagnosing concussions continues to be a problem. If a concussion goes undiagnosed, an athlete can face much greater risks by continuing to play while still being concussed. Past research has shown that the neural circuits responsible for eye movement are disrupted in concussed patients. In our project we used video-oculography (an eye tracker) to record head and eye movements of Whitman College Women’s soccer players on three different visual tasks pre-season, post-concussion, and post-season. We focused our analysis on the anti-saccade task, which involves looking in the opposite direction of a visual stimulus. We expect to find increased errors and deficits following concussion, and suggest that assessing eye-head movements in the anti-saccade task may serve as a quantitative diagnostic for concussion.

Faculty Sponsor

Thomas Knight

Tracks

poster

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Perry Summer Research Award

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Deficits in Anti-Saccade Eye Movement Metrics Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Female Athletes

Cordiner Hall

Sport-related concussion continues to be a public health concern in the U.S. Millions of Americans sustain concussions playing sports each year, but correctly diagnosing concussions continues to be a problem. If a concussion goes undiagnosed, an athlete can face much greater risks by continuing to play while still being concussed. Past research has shown that the neural circuits responsible for eye movement are disrupted in concussed patients. In our project we used video-oculography (an eye tracker) to record head and eye movements of Whitman College Women’s soccer players on three different visual tasks pre-season, post-concussion, and post-season. We focused our analysis on the anti-saccade task, which involves looking in the opposite direction of a visual stimulus. We expect to find increased errors and deficits following concussion, and suggest that assessing eye-head movements in the anti-saccade task may serve as a quantitative diagnostic for concussion.

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