Title

A Potential Role for the PIRL7 Gene in Plant Pollen Development

Abstract

I conducted my summer research on a novel family of genes termed Plant Intracellular Ras-group Leucine Rich Repeat proteins (PIRL’s) within Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species widely used for genome research. I focused on the PIRL7 gene and whether it functions in reproduction, mainly the development of male gametophytes (pollen). Using confocal, light, and scanning electron microscopy, I observed the phenotypic effects that a PIRL7 knockout mutation had on pollen development. In addition, I successfully created a gene construct containing the PIRL7 gene attached to the gene for Green Fluorescent Protein, which will be used in future experiments to determine where this gene is expressed. Data taken from pollen counts, viability staining, and microscopy suggest that pollen appears to be negatively affected when PIRL7 is inactivated.

Faculty Sponsor

Dan Vernon, Nancy Forsthoefel

Tracks

poster

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Perry Summer Research Award

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 2:00 PM

A Potential Role for the PIRL7 Gene in Plant Pollen Development

Cordiner Hall

I conducted my summer research on a novel family of genes termed Plant Intracellular Ras-group Leucine Rich Repeat proteins (PIRL’s) within Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species widely used for genome research. I focused on the PIRL7 gene and whether it functions in reproduction, mainly the development of male gametophytes (pollen). Using confocal, light, and scanning electron microscopy, I observed the phenotypic effects that a PIRL7 knockout mutation had on pollen development. In addition, I successfully created a gene construct containing the PIRL7 gene attached to the gene for Green Fluorescent Protein, which will be used in future experiments to determine where this gene is expressed. Data taken from pollen counts, viability staining, and microscopy suggest that pollen appears to be negatively affected when PIRL7 is inactivated.

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