Title

A Physiological Study of Lymnaea Foot

Abstract

Most gastropod molluscs use their foot to locomote despite differences in the substrate over which they crawl. Little, however, is known about the morphological and neural structures of the foot involved in locomotion. The pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, is a freshwater gastropod that employs both muscular and ciliary waves during crawling. Here we investigated the morphological characteristics of the L. stagnalis foot as well as the distribution of neurotransmitters previously found to be involved in locomotory behavior. To determine the structure of the foot tissue we used histological methods to differentiate tissue and cell type distributions. In addition, we used immunohistological techniques to determine the distribution of putative neuro-active molecules in the foot tissue. Preliminary results showed both extensive subdermal musculature and cells involved in mucus production. These findings, combined with the immunohistochemical labeling, provide a better understanding of the control of crawling in gastropods.

Faculty Sponsor

Shaun Cain

Tracks

poster

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

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A Physiological Study of Lymnaea Foot

Cordiner Hall

Most gastropod molluscs use their foot to locomote despite differences in the substrate over which they crawl. Little, however, is known about the morphological and neural structures of the foot involved in locomotion. The pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, is a freshwater gastropod that employs both muscular and ciliary waves during crawling. Here we investigated the morphological characteristics of the L. stagnalis foot as well as the distribution of neurotransmitters previously found to be involved in locomotory behavior. To determine the structure of the foot tissue we used histological methods to differentiate tissue and cell type distributions. In addition, we used immunohistological techniques to determine the distribution of putative neuro-active molecules in the foot tissue. Preliminary results showed both extensive subdermal musculature and cells involved in mucus production. These findings, combined with the immunohistochemical labeling, provide a better understanding of the control of crawling in gastropods.

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