Title

Influence of Calcium on Ligand Exchange Pathways

Abstract

The presence of chelating agents affects the bioavailability of both toxic and nutrient metals in aqueous environments. When metal ions are dissolved in water, they are coordinated to water molecules or other molecules with Lewis base groups called ligands. A chelating agent is a single ligand molecule that can bind multiple metal ion coordination sites simultaneously. Metal ion speciation in the presence of chelating agents is often controlled by the rates of ligand exchange reactions, where one ligand replaces another. To predict metal behavior in the environment, we need to understand the rates of these reactions. However, little is known about how the presence of common ions (calcium, magnesium, etc.) affects ligand exchange pathways. We used capillary electrophoresis to measure the rates of disjunctive ligand exchange reactions in the presence of calcium. By varying reactant concentrations we are able to propose a mechanistic pathway to model reaction rates.

Faculty Sponsor

Nate Boland

Tracks

poster

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Perry Summer Research Award

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Influence of Calcium on Ligand Exchange Pathways

Cordiner Hall

The presence of chelating agents affects the bioavailability of both toxic and nutrient metals in aqueous environments. When metal ions are dissolved in water, they are coordinated to water molecules or other molecules with Lewis base groups called ligands. A chelating agent is a single ligand molecule that can bind multiple metal ion coordination sites simultaneously. Metal ion speciation in the presence of chelating agents is often controlled by the rates of ligand exchange reactions, where one ligand replaces another. To predict metal behavior in the environment, we need to understand the rates of these reactions. However, little is known about how the presence of common ions (calcium, magnesium, etc.) affects ligand exchange pathways. We used capillary electrophoresis to measure the rates of disjunctive ligand exchange reactions in the presence of calcium. By varying reactant concentrations we are able to propose a mechanistic pathway to model reaction rates.

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