Title

Spatial Variation of Pteropod Diel Vertical Migration Along the Eastern Coast of New Zealand

Abstract

As the world’s oceans adjust to climate change, organisms in the oceans must also adapt. Pteropods, a pelagic sea snail, are a major marine food source and a principal contributor to the biological carbon pump. However, their calcium carbonate shells are susceptible to damage from increasingly acidic oceans such as the Southern Ocean. If pteropods adapt their diel vertical migration patterns while acclimating to ocean acidification, their contribution to the carbon sink and food web might also shift. Along the east coast of New Zealand, pteropods were collected significantly more often during night sampling than day sampling, supporting known DVM patterns. Light, temperature, pH, salinity and chlorophyll-a levels all showed weakly positive correlations with DVM; light showed the strongest correlation of the five and pH the second strongest. This data suggests that along the eastern coast of New Zealand pH plays a minor role in influencing DVM in pteropods.

Faculty Sponsor

Paul Yancey

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poster

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

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Spatial Variation of Pteropod Diel Vertical Migration Along the Eastern Coast of New Zealand

Cordiner Hall

As the world’s oceans adjust to climate change, organisms in the oceans must also adapt. Pteropods, a pelagic sea snail, are a major marine food source and a principal contributor to the biological carbon pump. However, their calcium carbonate shells are susceptible to damage from increasingly acidic oceans such as the Southern Ocean. If pteropods adapt their diel vertical migration patterns while acclimating to ocean acidification, their contribution to the carbon sink and food web might also shift. Along the east coast of New Zealand, pteropods were collected significantly more often during night sampling than day sampling, supporting known DVM patterns. Light, temperature, pH, salinity and chlorophyll-a levels all showed weakly positive correlations with DVM; light showed the strongest correlation of the five and pH the second strongest. This data suggests that along the eastern coast of New Zealand pH plays a minor role in influencing DVM in pteropods.

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