Title

Changes in Number of Multi-Saccade Gaze Shift as an Indicator of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Abstract

Mild Traumatic Brain injury (mTBI, or concussion) is a complex pathophysiological process that affects the brain and cognitive function. Sports-related concussions affect roughly 3.8 million individuals every year within the United States. Many of these concussions go undiagnosed and untreated— sometimes leading to life threatening conditions and further deficits— because there are currently no clinical devices to diagnose concussion. Our study examined whether assessing Multi-Saccade Gaze Shifts can be a useful tool in diagnosing concussions. MSGS occur when the eyes exhibit multiple rapid movements (also known as saccades) along with a head movement in order to shift gaze to inspect a visual stimulus. We used videooculography (an eye tracker) to assess MSGS by measuring eye and head movements of collegiate soccer players before and after concussion. We observed a greater number of MSGS following concussion, and suggest that assessing MSGS may serve as a quantitative diagnostic for concussion.

Faculty Sponsor

Thomas Knight

Tracks

poster

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Location

Cordiner Hall

Presentation Type

Poster

Research Funding Source or OCS Program

Perry Summer Research Grant

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Changes in Number of Multi-Saccade Gaze Shift as an Indicator of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Cordiner Hall

Mild Traumatic Brain injury (mTBI, or concussion) is a complex pathophysiological process that affects the brain and cognitive function. Sports-related concussions affect roughly 3.8 million individuals every year within the United States. Many of these concussions go undiagnosed and untreated— sometimes leading to life threatening conditions and further deficits— because there are currently no clinical devices to diagnose concussion. Our study examined whether assessing Multi-Saccade Gaze Shifts can be a useful tool in diagnosing concussions. MSGS occur when the eyes exhibit multiple rapid movements (also known as saccades) along with a head movement in order to shift gaze to inspect a visual stimulus. We used videooculography (an eye tracker) to assess MSGS by measuring eye and head movements of collegiate soccer players before and after concussion. We observed a greater number of MSGS following concussion, and suggest that assessing MSGS may serve as a quantitative diagnostic for concussion.

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