Title

The Perpetuation of the 'Criminal' in Black Athletes

Abstract

Over the past 20 years, mainstream magazines have featured dominant African American athletes depicted in a light that reinforces implicit racial biases. Through analysis of a 1996 Rolling Stone cover featuring Dennis Rodman, a 2002 Sports Illustrated cover featuring Charles Barkley, a 2008 Vogue cover featuring LeBron James and a 2010 Vanity Fair cover featuring Tiger Woods, we can see how photographers and publishers have the ability to shape meaning and a consequent discourse of their choice. These images influence the terministic screens through which viewers interpret their daily lives as well as depict racial biases which subsequently connect the black man to crime. I explore the notion of deep-rooted implicit readership bias and how photographers and publishers have the capability to reinforce the omnipresent fear of black men within white culture.

Faculty Sponsor

Heather Hayes

Tracks

Rhetoric Studies: American Narratives

Terms of Use

ARMINDA Terms of Use

Location

Kimball Theatre

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

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Apr 11th, 2:45 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

The Perpetuation of the 'Criminal' in Black Athletes

Kimball Theatre

Over the past 20 years, mainstream magazines have featured dominant African American athletes depicted in a light that reinforces implicit racial biases. Through analysis of a 1996 Rolling Stone cover featuring Dennis Rodman, a 2002 Sports Illustrated cover featuring Charles Barkley, a 2008 Vogue cover featuring LeBron James and a 2010 Vanity Fair cover featuring Tiger Woods, we can see how photographers and publishers have the ability to shape meaning and a consequent discourse of their choice. These images influence the terministic screens through which viewers interpret their daily lives as well as depict racial biases which subsequently connect the black man to crime. I explore the notion of deep-rooted implicit readership bias and how photographers and publishers have the capability to reinforce the omnipresent fear of black men within white culture.

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