Alan Stanley
Wed, 11/03/2021 - 07:52
Edited Text

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRUCTURE-­‐BASED
 DESIGN
 AND
 SYNTHESIS
 OF
 BIMODAL
 
PROTEASOME
 INHIBITORS
 AS
 THERAPEUTIC
 AGENTS
 


 

 

 
By
 
 
Zack
 Michael
 Strater
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
A
 thesis
 submitted
 in
 partial
 fulfillment
 of
 the
 requirements
 for
 graduation
 with
 
Honors
 in
 Chemistry
 

 

 
Whitman
 College
 
 
2014
 

 

 

 

 

 
i
 

 

Certificate
 of
 Approval
 

 
This
 is
 to
 certify
 that
 the
 accompanying
 thesis
 by
 Zack
 Michael
 Strater
 has
 been
 accepted
 in
 
partial
 fulfillment
 of
 the
 requirements
 for
 graduation
 with
 Honors
 in
 Chemistry.
 

 

 

 

 

 
________________________
 
Dr.
 Marion
 Götz
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Whitman
 College
 
May
 14,
 2014
 
ii
 

 

Table
 of
 Contents
 

 
Abstract
 .......................................................................................................................................
 iv
 
List
 of
 Figures,
 Schemes,
 and
 Tables
 ...........................................................................................
 v
 
List
 of
 Abbreviations
 ...................................................................................................................
 vi
 
Introduction
 ................................................................................................................................
 1
 

 

Review
 of
 Proteasome
 Inhibitors
 ...................................................................................
 7
 


 

Noncovalent
 Inhibitor
 TMC-­‐95A
 ....................................................................................
 11
 

Design
 Rationale
 .........................................................................................................................
 13
 
Chemistry/Synthesis
 ...................................................................................................................
 17
 
Results
 and
 Discussion
 ................................................................................................................
 20
 
Conclusion
 ...................................................................................................................................
 25
 
Experimental
 ...............................................................................................................................
 26
 
Acknowledgements
 ....................................................................................................................
 34
 
References
 ..................................................................................................................................
 35
 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

iii
 

 

Abstract
 

 

The
 proteasome
 is
 a
 multicatalytic
 enzyme
 responsible
 for
 degrading
 damaged,
 

misfolded,
 and
 uneeded
 intracellular
 proteins.
 
 Since
 many
 vital
 cellular
 pathways
 rely
 on
 the
 
degradative
 function
 of
 the
 proteasome,
 its
 dysregulation
 is
 implicated
 in
 the
 pathology
 of
 
several
 diseases,
 thus
 making
 it
 an
 attractive
 target
 for
 inhibition.
 
 Here
 we
 report
 two
 novel
 
tetrapeptide
 aldehyde
 inhibitors
 based
 on
 the
 structure
 of
 natural
 product
 TMC-­‐95A,
 a
 potent
 
noncovalent
 inhibitor
 of
 the
 proteasome.
 
 Conversion
 of
 the
 carbonyl
 of
 the
 C-­‐terminal
 residue
 
to
 an
 aldehyde
 enabled
 these
 inhibitors
 to
 covalently
 bind
 to
 the
 catalytic
 Thr
 residue
 of
 the
 
proteasome’s
 active
 site.
 
 The
 P1
 and
 P3
 residues,
 which
 engage
 with
 the
 primary
 active
 site
 
pockets,
 were
 varied
 to
 mimic
 TMC-­‐95A
 and
 MG-­‐132,
 a
 well
 known
 peptide
 aldehyde
 
proteasome
 inhibitor.
 
 The
 combination
 of
 covalent
 and
 noncovalent
 mechanisms
 of
 binding
 to
 
the
 active
 site
 allow
 these
 compounds
 to
 bimodally
 inhibit
 the
 proteasome.
 
 Additionally,
 the
 P2
 
and
 P4
 residues
 of
 two
 of
 the
 inhibitors
 were
 cyclized
 via
 a
 biaryl
 ether
 moiety
 in
 order
 to
 mimic
 
the
 synthetically
 inaccessible
 macrocycle
 found
 in
 TMC-­‐95A.
 
 The
 compounds
 were
 then
 tested
 
in
 vitro
 with
 20S
 proteasome
 using
 fluorometric
 reversible
 kinetics.
 
 The
 two
 macrocyclic
 lead
 
compounds
 were
 also
 compared
 to
 linear
 peptide
 aldehyde
 analogs
 that
 were
 prepared
 and
 
tested
 in
 the
 same
 fashion
 to
 the
 macrocycles.
 
 The
 resulting
 inhibition
 constants
 were
 used
 to
 
evaluate
 the
 effect
 of
 the
 macrocycle,
 the
 addition
 of
 the
 aldehyde
 functionality,
 and
 to
 
compare
 the
 different
 amino
 acid
 sequences.
 
 The
 aldehyde
 was
 found
 to
 greatly
 increase
 
potency
 compared
 to
 noncovalent
 inhibitors
 with
 a
 similar
 structure.
 
 The
 compounds
 with
 
amino
 acid
 sequences
 similar
 to
 MG-­‐132
 were
 the
 most
 potent
 (Ki
 =
 33
 nM,
 76
 nm)
 while
 the
 
cyclic
 compounds
 were
 found
 to
 be
 slightly
 less
 potent
 than
 their
 linear
 analogues.
 
 These
 
compounds
 were
 also
 tested
 with
 chymotrypsin,
 calpain,
 and
 cruzain
 to
 investigate
 their
 
inhibitory
 specificity.
 
 The
 kinetic
 data
 demonstrated
 that
 the
 general
 structure
 of
 the
 inhibitors
 
showed
 much
 greater
 affinity
 for
 the
 proteasome
 than
 for
 the
 other
 proteases
 tested.
 
 
iv
 

 

List
 of
 Figures,
 Schemes,
 and
 Tables
 

 
Figure
 1.
 Substrate-­‐protease
 binding
 interaction
 .......................................................................
 2
 
Figure
 2.
 The
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 pathway
 ............................................................................
 3
 
Figure
 3.
 The
 26S
 proteasome
 and
 cross
 section
 of
 the
 20S
 core
 ..............................................
 4
 
Figure
 4.
 Catalytic
 mechanism
 of
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site
 ....................................................
 5
 
Figure
 5.
 Structures
 of
 notable
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 ...............................................................
 7
 
Figure
 6.
 Mechanism
 of
 several
 important
 classes
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 ............................
 10
 
Figure
 7.
 H-­‐bonding
 array
 formed
 between
 TMC-­‐95A
 and
 the
 active
 site
 of
 the
 β2
 subunit
 .....
 12
 
Figure
 8.
 Structures
 of
 the
 biaryl
 ether
 TMC-­‐95A
 analogues
 K-­‐3a/b
 ..........................................
 13
 
Figure
 9.
 Structural
 modifications
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 leading
 to
 BIA
 compounds
 ................................
 15
 
Figure
 10.
 Structures
 of
 synthetic
 targets
 14,
 15,
 17,
 and
 18
 .....................................................
 16
 
Scheme
 1.
 Synthesis
 of
 modified
 L-­‐Phe
 7
 ...................................................................................
 17
 
Scheme
 2.
 Solid
 phase
 synthesis
 resulting
 in
 14,
 15,
 17,
 and
 18
 ................................................
 18
 
Table
 1.
 Inhibition
 constants
 for
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 ......................................................................
 21
 
Table
 2.
 Comparing
 inhibition
 constants
 of
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 to
 other
 proteases
 .............................
 24
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
v
 


 

List
 of
 Abbreviations
 
ACN
 –
 acetonitrile
 
 
Ac2O
 –
 acetic
 anhydride
 
AIBN
 –
 azobisdiisobutyronitrile
 
Ala
 –
 alanine
 
 
AMC
 –
 2-­‐amino-­‐4-­‐methylcoumarin
 
Arg
 –
 arginine
 
 
Asn
 –
 asparagine
 
 
ATP
 -­‐
 adenosine
 triphosphate
 
Cbz,
 Z
 –
 benzyloxycarbonyl
 
Cbz-­‐OSu
 –
 benzyloxycarbonyl
 succinimide
 
CCl4
 –
 carbon
 tetrachloride
 
CDCl3
 –
 deuterated
 chloroform
 
CH2Cl2
 –
 dichloromethane
 
CP
 –
 core
 particle
 
CT-­‐L
 –
 chymotrypsin-­‐like
 
DIPEA
 –
 N,N-­‐diisopropylethylamine
 
DMF
 –dimethylformamide
 
DMSO
 –
 dimethyl
 sulfoxide
 
DTT
 –
 dithiothreitol
 
EtOAc
 –
 ethyl
 acetate
 
Fmoc
 –
 fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl
 
Glu(OtBu)
 –
 glutamic
 acid
 5-­‐tert-­‐butyl
 ester
 
HATU
 –
 2-­‐(1H-­‐7-­‐azabenzotriazol-­‐1-­‐yl)-­‐1,1,3,3-­‐tetramethyl
 uronium
 hexafluorophosphate
 

 
methanaminium
 
 
MS
 -­‐
 mass
 spectrometry
 
2-­‐Nal
 –
 (2-­‐napthyl)-­‐L
 alanine
 
NAS
 –
 nucleophilic
 aromatic
 substitution
 
NBS
 –
 N-­‐bromosuccinimide
 
Nle
 –
 norleucine
 
 
NMR
 –
 nuclear
 magnetic
 resonance
 
PGPH
 –
 post
 glutamyl
 peptide
 hydrolyzing
 
 
Ph
 –
 phenyl
 
Phe
 –
 phenyalanine
 
 
TFA
 –
 trifluoroacetic
 acid
 
THF
 –
 tetrahydrofuran
 
Thr
 –
 threonine
 
 
 
T-­‐L
 –
 trypsin-­‐like
 
 
TLC
 –
 thin
 layer
 chromatography
 
Trt
 –
 triphenyl
 methyl
 
Tyr
 –
 tyrosine
 
 
UPP
 –
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 pathway
vi
 

 


 

Introduction
 

 

 

Proteins
 are
 one
 of
 the
 most
 ubiquitous
 and
 important
 molecules
 found
 in
 life.
 
 They
 are
 

the
 conduit
 by
 which
 our
 genetic
 data
 can
 be
 materialized
 and
 made
 useful
 within
 our
 cells.
 
 
Proteins
 comprise
 enzymes
 and
 much
 of
 cell
 structure
 as
 well
 as
 being
 responsible
 for
 
performing
 a
 variety
 of
 cellular
 functions
 such
 as
 signaling
 and
 molecular
 transport.
 
 As
 a
 result
 
of
 the
 integral
 role
 they
 play,
 their
 regulation
 is
 vital
 for
 maintaining
 cell
 homeostasis.
 

 

One
 of
 the
 primary
 ways
 in
 which
 cells
 can
 control
 the
 level
 of
 various
 proteins
 is
 by
 

degrading
 them.
 
 The
 cell
 enlists
 enzymes
 called
 proteases
 to
 break
 down
 proteins
 by
 catalyzing
 
the
 cleavage
 of
 the
 peptide
 bonds
 that
 link
 its
 constituent
 amino
 acid
 residues,
 a
 process
 called
 
proteolysis.
 
 These
 degradative
 enzymes
 come
 in
 several
 varieties,
 defined
 by
 their
 substrate
 
specificity
 and
 by
 their
 mode
 of
 proteolysis.
 
 Proteases
 enact
 their
 cleavage
 by
 two
 mechanisms;
 
glutamic,
 aspartic,
 and
 metalloproteases
 use
 an
 activated
 water
 to
 attack
 the
 carbonyl
 of
 a
 
peptide
 bond,
 while
 serine,
 threonine,
 and
 cysteine
 proteases
 use
 a
 nucleophilic
 residue
 to
 
initiate
 attack
 at
 the
 carbonyl
 and
 then
 hydrolyze
 the
 resulting
 acyl-­‐enzyme
 intermediate.1
 
 The
 
substrate
 specificity
 of
 proteases
 is
 achieved
 by
 the
 character
 (i.e.
 hydrophobic,
 basic,
 acidic)
 of
 
the
 residues
 that
 make
 up
 the
 binding
 pockets
 (S
 sites)
 in
 the
 active
 site.2
 
 The
 residues
 of
 the
 
substrate
 (P
 residues)
 can
 be
 accommodated
 by
 the
 S
 sites,
 thereby
 aligning
 the
 scissile
 bond
 of
 
the
 protein
 with
 the
 catalytic
 moiety
 of
 the
 protease
 (Figure
 1).
 
 The
 P
 residues
 starting
 from
 the
 
scissile
 bond
 moving
 towards
 the
 N-­‐terminus
 of
 the
 protein
 are
 labeled
 P1,
 P2,
 P3
 .
 .
 .
 PN
 and
 
are
 accommodated
 by
 the
 S1,
 S2,
 S3
 .
 .
 .
 SN
 sites
 respectively.
 
 The
 C-­‐terminal
 side
 of
 the
 
protein,
 also
 known
 as
 the
 prime
 side,
 is
 labeled
 in
 a
 similar
 way
 moving
 outward
 from
 the
 
scissile
 bond,
 with
 P1’,
 P2’,
 P3’
 .
 .
 .
 PN’
 being
 accommodated
 by
 the
 S1’,
 S2’,
 S3’
 .
 .
 .
 SN’
 sites
 
respectively.
 
 The
 proteolytic
 activity
 of
 a
 protease
 can
 vary
 from
 promiscuous,
 in
 the
 case
 of
 the
 

1
 

 

digestive
 enzyme
 trypsin,
 to
 highly
 selective,
 in
 the
 case
 of
 thrombin,
 a
 protease
 involved
 in
 
blood
 clotting,
 based
 on
 how
 numerous
 and
 well-­‐defined
 the
 S
 sites
 of
 the
 active
 are.
 
 

Substrat
e
H2N P3

 

 

S3
Proteas

 
 
 e

P2

 

P1

 
 


 

S2

P1'

S1

P2'

 

S1'

P3' COOH

 

S2'

S3'

 

Figure
 1.
 Substrate-­‐protease
 binding
 interaction.
 The
 P
 residues
 of
 the
 substrate
 fit
 into
 the
 S
 
sites
 of
 the
 protease
 with
 the
 blue
 triangle
 representing
 the
 scissile
 moiety
 of
 the
 protease.3
 
 
 

 

 
The
 cell
 oscillates
 this
 degradative
 pathway
 in
 order
 to
 limit
 or
 increase
 the
 supply
 of
 
proteins,
 thereby
 regulating
 the
 processes
 mediated
 by
 the
 presence
 of
 those
 proteins.
 
 A
 great
 
example
 of
 this
 phenomenon
 is
 the
 cell
 cycle,
 in
 which
 the
 presence
 of
 proteins
 called
 cyclins
 
induce
 cyclin-­‐dependent
 kinase
 acivity
 in
 order
 proceed
 through
 the
 different
 phases
 of
 the
 cell
 
cycle.
 
 Cells
 can
 limit
 the
 type
 and
 amount
 of
 cyclins
 present
 via
 degradation
 by
 a
 distinctive
 kind
 
of
 protease
 called
 a
 proteasome.4-­‐5
 
 The
 proteasome
 is
 unique
 in
 that
 it
 selectively
 degrades
 
proteins
 that
 have
 been
 marked
 by
 a
 polyubiquitin
 chain.6
 
 Ubiquitin-­‐activating
 enzyme,
 
ubiquitin-­‐conjugating
 enzyme,
 and
 ubiquitin
 ligases
 work
 together
 to
 attach
 a
 polyubiquitin
 
chain
 to
 a
 protein,
 enabling
 proteasomal
 recognition
 and
 degradation
 of
 the
 tagged
 protein.6
 
 
This
 system
 of
 ubiquitination
 and
 subsequent
 proteasomal
 degradation
 is
 called
 the
 ubiquitin-­‐
proteasome
 pathway
 (UPP)
 (Figure
 2).
 
 In
 order
 to
 advance
 from
 one
 stage
 of
 the
 cell
 cycle
 to
 
the
 next,
 the
 cell
 utilizes
 the
 ubiquination
 system
 to
 tag
 specific
 cyclins
 in
 order
 to
 signal
 for
 
their
 degradation
 and
 stem
 their
 effect
 on
 the
 current
 stage
 of
 the
 cell
 cycle.4
 
 In
 addition
 to
 

2
 

 

controlling
 the
 levels
 of
 process-­‐regulating
 proteins,
 the
 UPP
 also
 facilitates
 the
 quality
 control
 
of
 proteins
 by
 degrading
 ones
 that
 are
 damaged
 or
 misfolded.
 
 
 
 
 

 


 

 
Figure
 2.
 The
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 pathway.
 
 Cells
 use
 ubiquitinating
 enzymes
 in
 conjunction
 
with
 the
 proteolytic
 activity
 of
 the
 proteasome
 in
 order
 to
 degrade
 specific
 proteins
 into
 smaller
 
peptide
 fragments.7
 
 

 

 
The
 UPP
 is
 the
 major
 regulator
 of
 protein
 turnover
 within
 the
 cell.8-­‐11
 Misfolded,
 
damaged,
 and
 unneeded
 intracellular
 proteins
 are
 tagged
 with
 a
 polyubiquitin
 chain,
 signaling
 
for
 their
 imminent
 degradation
 by
 the
 proteasome.
 
 As
 such,
 the
 UPP
 plays
 a
 vital
 role
 in
 
facilitating
 several
 intracellular
 processes
 that
 are
 mediated
 by
 the
 presence
 of
 specific
 proteins
 
such
 as
 the
 cell
 cycle,
 apoptosis,
 signal
 transduction,
 immune
 response,
 and
 transcription.4-­‐5,
 12-­‐15
 
 
 

 

 

3
 

 

Figure
 3.
 The
 26S
 proteasome
 and
 cross
 section
 of
 the
 20S
 core.
 
 Left:
 a
 space
 filling
 depiction
 of
 
the
 26S
 proteasome
 and
 its
 constituent
 parts.
 
 Right:
 a
 cross
 section
 of
 the
 20S
 core
 particle
 with
 
the
 location
 of
 its
 three
 different
 active
 sites
 labeled.16
 

 

 
The
 26S
 proteasome
 is
 a
 multicatalytic
 enzyme
 with
 a
 large
 barrel-­‐like
 structure
 that
 
consists
 of
 two
 19S
 regulatory
 caps
 and
 a
 20S
 core
 particle
 (Figure
 3).17
 
 The
 19S
 regulatory
 caps
 
recognize
 polyubiquitin-­‐labeled
 proteins
 and
 subsequently
 deubiquitinate,
 unfold,
 and
 finally
 
deliver
 the
 proteins
 to
 the
 proteolytic
 20S
 core
 particle
 (CP).6
 
 The
 CP
 consists
 of
 four
 
heptameric
 rings;
 the
 subunits
 of
 the
 two
 outer
 α
 rings
 are
 structural
 in
 nature
 while
 those
 in
 
the
 two
 inner
 β
 rings
 house
 the
 catalytic
 machinery
 responsible
 for
 degrading
 polypeptides
 into
 
small
 peptide
 fragments.17
 
 The
 proteasome
 employs
 three
 types
 of
 proteolytic
 activity
 for
 
protein
 degradation:
 Peptidyl-­‐glutamyl
 peptide-­‐hydrolyzing
 activity
 (PGPH)
 or
 caspase-­‐like,
 
Trypsin-­‐like
 (T-­‐L),
 and
 chymotrypsin-­‐like
 (CT-­‐L),
 which
 are
 located
 in
 the
 β1,
 β2,
 and
 β5
 subunits
 
of
 the
 β
 rings
 respectively
 (Figure
 3).17-­‐18
 
 These
 proteolytic
 activities
 are
 named
 in
 reference
 to
 
other
 proteases
 that
 have
 similar
 substrate
 specificities.
 
 The
 three
 different
 activities
 
4
 

 


 

preferentially
 direct
 cleavage
 to
 acidic
 (PGPH),
 basic
 (T-­‐L),
 and
 large
 hydrophobic
 amino
 acid
 
residues
 (CT-­‐L).19
 
 Each
 active
 site
 utilizes
 the
 γ-­‐hydroxyl
 group
 of
 the
 N-­‐terminal
 threonine
 (Thr)
 
in
 order
 initiate
 a
 nucleophilic
 attack
 on
 the
 carbonyl
 group
 of
 the
 specified
 amino
 acid
 
residue.17,
 20
 
 The
 nitrogen
 of
 the
 Thr
 then
 delivers
 a
 nucleophilic
 water
 molecule
 to
 hydrolyze
 
the
 resulting
 acyl-­‐enzyme
 intermediate
 (Figure
 4).
 

 


 

 
Figure
 4.
 Catalytic
 mechanism
 of
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site.
 
 The
 proteasome
 is
 classified
 as
 an
 
N-­‐terminal
 Thr
 hydrolase.16
 

 

 
The
 dysregulation
 of
 the
 UPP
 has
 been
 implicated
 in
 the
 pathology
 of
 autoimmune,
 
inflammatory,
 and
 neurodegenerative
 disorders
 as
 well
 as
 several
 types
 of
 cancer,
 thus
 making
 
the
 proteasome
 an
 attractive
 therapeutic
 target.21-­‐23
 
 Clinical
 trials
 have
 already
 revealed
 
proteasome
 inhibitors
 to
 be
 an
 effective
 treatment
 of
 multiple
 myeloma
 and
 mantel
 cell
 
lymphoma.24-­‐26
 
 The
 cytotoxicity
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 stems
 from
 the
 accumulation
 of
 
proteins
 within
 the
 cell
 due
 to
 the
 inactivation
 of
 the
 proteolytic
 activity
 of
 the
 UPP.27-­‐28
 
 This
 
5
 

 

effect
 stabilizes
 short
 lived
 proteins
 that
 are
 important
 in
 controlling
 the
 cell
 cycle
 and
 initiating
 
apoptosis
 such
 as
 tumor
 suppressor
 p53,
 cyclin-­‐dependent
 kinase
 inhibitor
 p27kip1,
 cyclins,
 
apoptosis
 regulator
 BAX,
 and
 NF-­‐kappa
 B
 precursor
 p105,
 which
 can
 only
 be
 activated
 by
 
modification
 by
 the
 proteasome.5,
 29-­‐33
 
 The
 overabundance
 of
 these
 proapoptotic
 and
 cell
 cycle
 
regulating
 proteins
 perturbs
 cell
 homeostasis,
 leading
 to
 eventual
 cell
 cycle
 arrest
 and
 
programmed
 cell
 death.
 
 This
 effect
 can
 be
 exploited
 due
 to
 the
 fact
 that
 proteasomal
 activity
 is
 
overexpressed
 in
 cancerous
 tissue.34-­‐35
 
 Tests
 with
 cancer
 cell
 lines
 have
 revealed
 that
 
proteasome
 inhibitors
 preferentially
 induce
 apoptosis
 in
 transformed
 cells
 over
 healthy
 cells,
 
which
 gave
 initial
 support
 for
 the
 idea
 that
 these
 compounds
 could
 be
 used
 as
 antineoplastic
 
agents.36-­‐39
 
 It
 should
 be
 noted
 that
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 has
 traditionally
 been
 the
 main
 target
 of
 
inhibition
 for
 cancer
 treatment.
 
 Firstly,
 since
 CT-­‐L
 specific
 inhibitors
 generally
 contain
 
hydrophobic
 residues
 so
 as
 to
 produce
 stronger
 binding
 with
 the
 hydrophobic
 pockets
 within
 
the
 CT-­‐L
 binding
 site,
 they
 are
 more
 likely
 to
 be
 cell
 permeable
 and
 therefore
 make
 better
 drug
 
candidates.
 
 Secondly,
 mutational
 studies
 on
 the
 proteasome
 have
 revealed
 that
 deactivation
 of
 
the
 CT-­‐L
 site
 leads
 to
 significantly
 decreased
 cell
 growth
 and
 accumulation
 of
 proteins,
 while
 
deactivation
 of
 the
 T-­‐L
 or
 PGPH
 activities
 only
 showed
 slight
 or
 no
 effect
 on
 protein
 
accumulation
 and
 cell
 growth.40-­‐42
 
 These
 results
 demonstrate
 that
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 is
 the
 most
 
important
 for
 protein
 degradation
 and
 its
 inhibition
 is
 of
 primary
 importance
 when
 induction
 of
 
apoptosis
 is
 desired
 for
 therapeutic
 purposes.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Although
 the
 two
 current
 clinical
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 drugs
 (bortezomib
 and
 

carfilzomib)
 show
 promising
 results
 in
 treating
 multiple
 myeloma,
 they
 also
 cause
 peripheral
 
neuropathy
 in
 patients
 as
 a
 result
 of
 binding
 to
 the
 HtrA2/Omi,
 an
 ATP
 dependent
 serine
 
protease,
 thus
 warranting
 further
 exploration
 of
 novel
 proteasome
 inhibitors.43-­‐46
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
6
 

 

Review
 of
 Proteasome
 Inhibitors
 

 


 
Figure
 5.
 Structures
 of
 notable
 proteasome
 inhibitors.
 
 Bortezomib
 and
 Carfilzomib
 are
 both
 FDA
 
approved
 for
 treatment
 of
 multiple
 myeloma,
 while
 MG-­‐132
 is
 one
 of
 the
 most
 potent
 inhibitors
 
of
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity.
 


 

 

The
 scope
 of
 the
 proteasome’s
 integral
 role
 in
 facilitating
 a
 variety
 of
 cellular
 pathways
 

was
 not
 fully
 revealed
 until
 its
 inhibition
 was
 investigated.
 
 Upon
 greater
 understanding
 of
 the
 
proteasome’s
 function
 in
 the
 cell
 and
 how
 its
 inhibition
 could
 be
 exploited
 for
 therapeutic
 use,
 
the
 search
 for
 potent
 and
 selective
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 became
 a
 heavily
 researched
 field.
 
 
Although
 initially
 designed
 as
 anti-­‐inflammatory
 agents,
 it
 was
 quickly
 found
 that
 the
 application
 
of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 to
 cancer
 cell
 lines
 induced
 apoptosis,
 prompting
 the
 development
 of
 
these
 compounds
 as
 anticancer
 agents.47
 
 Proteasome
 inhibitors
 are
 also
 currently
 being
 
investigated
 as
 treatment
 for
 a
 variety
 of
 disorders
 including
 allograft
 rejection
 in
 transplant
 
patients,
 autoimmune
 diseases,
 and
 reperfusion
 injury
 after
 stroke.14,
 33,
 48-­‐53
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Peptide
 aldehydes
 were
 the
 first
 class
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 to
 be
 explored
 and
 are
 

still
 the
 most
 commonly
 researched.16
 
 They
 reversibly
 bind
 to
 the
 γ-­‐hydroxyl
 Thr
 of
 the
 
proteasome
 active
 site,
 forming
 a
 hemiacetal
 that
 prevents
 it
 from
 cleaving
 ubiquitinated
 
proteins
 (Figure
 6).
 
 Peptide
 aldehydes
 are
 very
 inexpensive
 to
 prepare
 and
 are
 easy
 to
 access
 
synthetically.
 
 However,
 aldehydes
 have
 a
 short
 half-­‐life
 in
 vivo
 due
 to
 their
 rapid
 oxidation
 and
 
are
 also
 known
 to
 inhibit
 serine
 and
 cysteine
 proteases,
 thus
 limiting
 their
 use
 as
 therapeutic
 
7
 

 

agents.54
 
 MG-­‐132,
 an
 all
 Leu
 tripeptide
 aldehyde,
 is
 one
 of
 the
 most
 potent
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 CT-­‐
L
 (Ki
 =
 2-­‐4
 nM)
 and
 is
 commonly
 used
 as
 a
 reference
 to
 compare
 the
 relative
 potency
 of
 new
 
proteasome
 inhibitors
 (Figure
 5).55
 
 Fellutamide
 B
 and
 Tyropeptin
 A
 are
 also
 natural
 occurring
 
peptide
 aldehydes
 that
 were
 found
 to
 inhibit
 the
 proteasome.53,
 56
 
 

 

Peptide
 boronates
 are
 an
 especially
 important
 class
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 as
 they
 

include
 bortezomib,
 the
 first
 FDA
 approved
 drug
 targeting
 the
 proteasome
 (Figure
 5).
 
 The
 
boronic
 acid
 functional
 group
 of
 peptide
 boronates
 serves
 as
 an
 electrophilic
 trap
 in
 a
 similar
 
way
 to
 an
 aldehyde.
 
 However,
 upon
 nucleophilic
 attack
 by
 the
 catalytic
 Thr
 residue,
 the
 boronic
 
acid
 forms
 a
 tetrahedral
 species,
 which
 is
 stabilized
 by
 hydrogen
 bonding
 between
 the
 boron
 
hydroxyl
 and
 the
 amino
 group
 of
 the
 N-­‐terminal
 Thr
 residue
 (Figure
 6).57
 
 This
 effect
 allows
 
peptide
 boronates
 to
 be
 more
 potent
 and
 specific
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 proteasomes
 than
 their
 
aldehyde
 analogues.55
 
 Bortezomib
 first
 became
 a
 compound
 of
 interest
 when
 it
 was
 found
 to
 
induce
 cell
 death
 in
 a
 variety
 of
 different
 cancer
 cell
 lines.58
 
 It
 was
 then
 tested
 in
 animal
 trials
 
with
 xenograft
 tumors
 where
 it
 was
 found
 to
 drastically
 reduce
 angiogensis
 and
 metastasis.59-­‐60
 
 
Phase
 I
 trials
 tested
 the
 compound
 with
 several
 types
 of
 cancers,
 and
 it
 was
 revealed
 that
 
bortezomib
 performed
 well
 in
 patients
 with
 multiple
 myeloma.61-­‐62
 
 Successful
 phase
 II
 trials
 led
 
to
 the
 drug
 being
 swiftly
 approved
 by
 the
 FDA
 for
 third-­‐line
 treatment
 for
 patients
 with
 relapsed
 
and
 refractory
 multiple
 myeloma,
 and
 eventually
 for
 first-­‐line
 treatment.63
 
 As
 previously
 
mentioned,
 one
 major
 issue
 with
 bortezomib
 and
 other
 peptide
 boronates
 is
 that
 they
 inhibit
 
the
 HtrA2/Omi,
 a
 mitochondrial
 serine
 protease,
 which
 can
 in
 turn
 lead
 to
 peripheral
 neuropathy
 
in
 patients.43-­‐46
 
 This
 side
 effect
 has
 been
 one
 of
 the
 major
 reasons
 that
 research
 groups
 are
 still
 
focused
 on
 finding
 alternative
 proteasome
 inhibitors.44
 
 Another
 potential
 concern
 is
 that
 
boronate
 inhibitors
 take
 too
 long
 to
 dissociate
 from
 the
 proteasome’s
 active
 sites,
 which
 has
 
spurred
 the
 creation
 of
 a
 second
 generation
 of
 peptide
 boronates
 including
 compounds
 
8
 

 

MLN9708
 and
 CEP-­‐18770,
 which
 were
 designed
 to
 be
 more
 selective
 and
 have
 faster
 
dissociation
 rates
 than
 bortezomib.64-­‐66
 
 
 
 

 

Peptide
 α’-­‐β’-­‐epoxyketones
 are
 a
 unique
 class
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 because
 their
 

mechanism
 of
 binding
 to
 the
 active
 site
 is
 highly
 specific.
 
 α’-­‐β’-­‐epoxyketones
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 
proteasome
 were
 originally
 discovered
 in
 natural
 products
 epoxomicin
 and
 eponemycin.67-­‐68
 
 
Their
 high
 specificity
 is
 due
 to
 the
 fact
 that
 the
 catalytic
 residue
 of
 the
 proteasome
 is
 positioned
 
on
 the
 N-­‐terminus,
 which
 is
 a
 unique
 feature
 when
 compared
 to
 most
 other
 proteases.
 
 The
 Thr
 
hydroxyl
 attacks
 the
 carbonyl,
 which
 then
 places
 the
 Thr
 amine
 in
 close
 proximity
 to
 the
 epoxide
 
ring.
 
 The
 amine
 can
 then
 nucleophilically
 open
 the
 ring
 and
 produce
 a
 morpholino
 ring,
 making
 
α’-­‐β’-­‐epoxyketones
 irreversible
 inhibitors
 (Figure
 6).69
 
 Carfilzomib,
 a
 compound
 derived
 from
 
the
 structure
 of
 epoxomicin
 (Figure
 5),
 performed
 extraordinarily
 well
 in
 clinical
 trials
 and
 was
 
granted
 accelerated
 approval
 by
 the
 FDA
 in
 2012
 for
 treatment
 of
 patients
 with
 multiple
 
myeloma.70-­‐71
 
 It
 was
 shown
 to
 reduce
 the
 incidence
 of
 peripheral
 neuropathy
 compared
 to
 
bortezomib,
 which
 can
 mainly
 be
 attributed
 to
 its
 highly
 specific
 mechanism
 of
 covalent
 
inhibition.43
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

9
 

 


 

 
Figure
 6.
 Mechanisms
 of
 several
 important
 classes
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors.
 
 All
 classes
 shown
 
posses
 an
 electrophilic
 site
 that
 can
 bind
 to
 the
 γ-­‐hydroxyl
 of
 the
 N-­‐terminal
 Thr
 in
 the
 
proteasome
 active
 site.
 
 Engaging
 with
 the
 Thr
 amino
 group
 either
 covalently
 or
 through
 an
 
electrostatic
 stabilization
 increases
 the
 affinity
 and
 specificity
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors.16
 
 
 

 

 
Several
 other
 varieties
 of
 structures
 have
 been
 investigated,
 with
 varying
 degrees
 of
 
success
 as
 proteasome
 inhibitors.
 
 Peptide
 ketoaldehydes
 utilize
 a
 Schiff
 base
 to
 reversibly
 bind
 
to
 the
 active
 site,
 β-­‐lactones,
 a
 class
 of
 natural
 products
 and
 their
 synthetic
 derivatives
 
(omuralide
 and
 marizomib),
 esterify
 the
 Thr
 hydroxyl
 group,
 while
 peptide
 vinyl
 sulfones
 and
 
syrbactins
 use
 a
 Michael
 acceptor
 to
 bind
 to
 the
 proteasome
 active
 sites
 (Figure
 6).72-­‐78
 
 Natural
 

10
 

 

products
 such
 as
 TMC-­‐95A,
 Argyrin
 A,
 and
 Scytonemides
 A
 and
 B
 have
 been
 found
 to
 
noncovalently
 inhibit
 the
 proteasome,
 which
 is
 especially
 pharmaceutically
 desirable
 because
 
lack
 of
 a
 reactive
 functional
 group
 greatly
 reduces
 the
 chances
 of
 off-­‐target
 effects.79-­‐81
 
 There
 
have
 been
 efforts
 to
 design
 inhibitors
 that
 specifically
 target
 the
 T-­‐L
 and
 PGPH
 activities.
 
 These
 
site
 specific
 inhibitors
 have
 shown
 to
 exhibit
 a
 synergistic
 effect
 when
 used
 in
 combination
 with
 
compounds
 that
 target
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity,
 making
 multiple
 myeloma
 cells
 more
 sensitive
 to
 
treatment
 with
 bortezomib
 and
 carfilzomib.82-­‐83
 One
 emerging
 field
 of
 proteasome
 research
 is
 
the
 investigation
 of
 the
 function
 and
 inhibition
 of
 the
 immunoproteasome,
 which
 has
 subtle
 
variations
 from
 the
 normal
 (constitutive)
 proteasome
 and
 is
 only
 expressed
 in
 immune
 system
 
tissues.14,
 84-­‐85
 
 Future
 work
 might
 look
 to
 further
 reduce
 promiscuous
 binding
 of
 proteasome
 
inhibitors,
 greater
 elaboration
 of
 how
 the
 nondominant
 proteolytic
 activities
 (T-­‐L
 and
 PGPH)
 are
 
involved
 in
 proteasomal
 degradation
 of
 proteins,
 exploration
 of
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 enzymes
 found
 
in
 the
 19S
 regulatory
 caps
 of
 the
 proteasome,
 investigation
 of
 the
 advantages
 of
 designing
 
inhibitors
 that
 selectively
 inhibit
 the
 immunoprotease,
 as
 well
 as
 continuing
 the
 search
 for
 
potential
 therapeutic
 use
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 beyond
 cancer
 treatment.16
 
 

 

Noncovalent
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 TMC-­‐95A
 

 

 

Most
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 proteasome
 are
 small,
 linear
 peptides
 that
 contain
 an
 

electrophilic
 trap
 (also
 known
 as
 a
 warhead)
 to
 covalently
 bond
 to
 the
 catalytic
 Thr
 residue
 of
 
the
 proteasome
 active
 site.16
 
 Bortezomib
 and
 carfilzomib,
 the
 only
 two
 FDA
 approved
 
proteasome
 inhibitor
 drugs,
 both
 follow
 this
 structural
 motif.
 
 TMC-­‐95A
 is
 a
 natural
 product
 
found
 in
 the
 fungus
 Apiospora
 montagnei
 Sacc.
 that
 accomplishes
 a
 unique
 method
 of
 
proteasome
 inhibition.
 
 It
 is
 a
 macrocyclic
 tripeptide
 (AA
 sequence:
 highly
 oxidized
 Trp,
 Asn,
 Tyr)
 
that
 is
 able
 to
 potently
 bind
 to
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site
 solely
 through
 a
 hydrogen
 bonding
 
11
 

 

array
 (Figure
 7).
 
 Crystal
 structure
 data
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 bound
 to
 the
 proteasome
 shows
 that
 the
 
unique
 scaffold
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 affords
 several
 advantageous
 interactions
 with
 the
 active
 site
 
(Figure
 7).79
 
 It
 is
 theorized
 that
 the
 macrocyclic
 structure
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 is
 a
 key
 structural
 feature
 
involved
 in
 the
 binding
 to
 the
 proteasome
 as
 it
 adds
 rigidity
 through
 β-­‐extension
 of
 the
 peptide
 
backbone,
 lowering
 the
 entropic
 cost
 of
 binding
 as
 well
 as
 allowing
 the
 C-­‐terminal
 (Z)-­‐prop-­‐1-­‐
enyl
 and
 side
 chains
 of
 the
 Asn
 to
 fit
 into
 the
 S1
 and
 S3
 sites
 respectively,
 which
 are
 the
 most
 
prominent
 pockets
 in
 the
 active
 site.17,
 79,
 86
 The
 resulting
 hydrogen
 bonding
 array
 created
 by
 the
 
conformationally
 restricted
 peptide
 backbone
 and
 the
 residues
 in
 the
 active
 site
 resembles
 that
 
of
 an
 antiparallel
 β-­‐sheet.79
 
 TMC-­‐95A’s
 spatial
 orientation
 thereby
 facilitates
 several
 specific
 
interactions
 between
 the
 enzyme
 subsites
 and
 the
 extended
 peptide
 backbone,
 allowing
 it
 to
 
bind
 with
 high
 affinity
 and
 specificity.79
 
 
 
Figure
 7.
 H-­‐bonding
 array
 formed
 
between
 TMC-­‐95A
 and
 the
 active
 site
 
of
 the
 β2
 subunit
 (T-­‐L
 activity).
 
 
Prominent
 hydrogen
 bonds
 are
 shown
 
in
 green
 with
 their
 distances
 in
 Å
 while
 
hydrophobic
 interactions
 are
 shown
 as
 
green
 half
 circles.
 
 The
 Lys33
 residue
 
resides
 in
 the
 S1
 pocket,
 while
 the
 
Asp114
 defines
 the
 majority
 of
 the
 
character
 of
 the
 cavernous
 S3
 pocket.
 
 
Variations
 in
 the
 residues
 located
 in
 
the
 S1
 and
 S3
 pockets
 are
 responsible
 
for
 the
 substrate
 specificities
 of
 the
 β1,
 
β2,
 and
 β5
 subunits
 of
 the
 CP.79
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

TMC-­‐95A
 is
 able
 to
 inhibit
 all
 three
 activities
 of
 the
 proteasome
 to
 varying
 degrees,
 

although
 it
 most
 potently
 blocks
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 (IC50
 =
 5.4
 nM
 (CT-­‐L),
 200
 nM
 (T-­‐L),
 60
 nM
 
(PGPH).87
 
 Additionally,
 it
 shows
 no
 affinity
 to
 other
 proteases,
 which
 is
 mainly
 due
 to
 the
 fact
 
that
 its
 mechanism
 of
 inhibition
 does
 not
 rely
 on
 creating
 a
 covalent
 bond
 with
 the
 enzyme
 via
 a
 
reactive
 functional
 group.87
 
 However,
 the
 potential
 use
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 as
 a
 drug
 is
 prohibited
 by
 
12
 

 

the
 infeasibility
 of
 its
 large
 scale
 production,
 both
 through
 synthetic
 routes
 and
 by
 isolation
 from
 
its
 biological
 source.87-­‐88
 
 

 

Here
 we
 report
 the
 synthesis
 and
 biological
 activity
 of
 a
 new
 class
 of
 proteasome
 

inhibitors
 that
 seeks
 to
 take
 advantage
 of
 the
 unique
 scaffold
 of
 natural
 product
 TMC-­‐95A.
 
 The
 
structure
 of
 the
 previously
 reported
 BIA
 compounds89-­‐90,
 a
 simplified
 TMC-­‐95A
 analogue,
 was
 
used
 as
 a
 template
 for
 our
 inhibitors.
 
 An
 electrophilic
 warhead
 was
 added
 to
 the
 C-­‐terminus
 of
 
the
 inhibitors
 in
 order
 to
 bind
 covalently
 with
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site.
 
 Thus,
 these
 novel
 
inhibitors
 are
 hypothesized
 to
 be
 able
 to
 achieve
 bimodal
 inhibition
 of
 the
 proteasome,
 both
 
through
 covalent
 binding
 and
 through
 the
 advantageous
 hydrogen
 bonding
 array
 afforded
 by
 
the
 mimicked
 TMC-­‐95A
 structure.
 
 The
 inhibitory
 potency
 of
 the
 synthesized
 compounds
 was
 
tested
 in
 vitro
 with
 the
 20S
 proteasome
 as
 well
 as
 with
 various
 Thr
 and
 Ser
 proteases.
 
 
 

 

Design
 Rationale
 

 

 

The
 design
 of
 our
 novel
 inhibitors
 is
 based
 on
 the
 structure
 of
 the
 BIA
 compounds,
 a
 

series
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 analogues
 that
 were
 initially
 described
 by
 Kaiser
 et
 al.
 (K-­‐3a/b)89
 
 (Figure
 8)
 
 

 
Figure
 8.
 Structures
 of
 the
 
biaryl
 ether
 TMC-­‐95A
 
analogues
 K-­‐3a/b.
 
 These
 
compounds
 were
 initially
 
described
 by
 Kaiser
 et
 al.89
 
 and
 
later
 became
 known
 as
 the
 BIA
 
series
 when
 they
 were
 further
 
investigated
 in
 a
 later
 study
 by
 
Groll
 et
 al.90
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
and
 were
 further
 investigated
 by
 Groll
 et
 al.
 (BIA
 series).90
 BIA
 retains
 the
 peptide
 backbone
 and
 
macrocyclic
 nature
 of
 TMC-­‐95A,
 but
 is
 much
 more
 synthetically
 accessible
 due
 to
 simplifications
 

13
 

 

to
 the
 structure
 (Figure
 9).
 
 The
 biaryl
 moiety
 bridging
 the
 macrocycle
 in
 TMC-­‐95A
 was
 
converted
 to
 a
 biaryl
 ether
 moiety,
 thereby
 avoiding
 the
 synthetically
 demanding
 metal-­‐
mediated
 cross
 coupling
 reactions
 that
 would
 otherwise
 be
 necessary
 to
 form
 a
 biaryl
 bond.88
 
 It
 
is
 known
 that
 biaryl
 ethers
 can
 enact
 the
 same
 conformational
 restriction
 compared
 to
 biaryl
 
linkages
 in
 cyclic
 peptides.91-­‐93
 
 This
 biaryl
 ether
 linkage
 was
 achieved
 by
 exchanging
 the
 oxidized
 
Trp
 and
 Tyr
 residues
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 with
 Tyr
 and
 modified
 Phe
 (3-­‐F,
 4-­‐NO2)
 residues
 respectively,
 
which
 could
 then
 be
 readily
 converted
 into
 a
 biaryl
 ether
 via
 an
 intramolecular
 nucleophilic
 
substitution
 on
 the
 meta
 site
 of
 the
 Phe
 analogue.
 
 The
 meta(Phe(4-­‐NO2))-­‐para(Tyr)
 biaryl
 ether
 
linkage
 in
 the
 BIA
 compounds
 creates
 a
 macrocycle
 that
 is
 the
 same
 size
 (17
 membered)
 as
 
TMC-­‐95A
 and
 has
 been
 computationally
 shown
 to
 exhibit
 the
 same
 conformational
 extension
 of
 
the
 peptide
 backbone.90
 
 The
 N-­‐terminal
 3-­‐methyl-­‐2-­‐oxopentanoyl
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 was
 found
 to
 not
 
significantly
 interact
 with
 the
 proteasome
 binding
 site
 and
 was
 thus
 exchanged
 with
 a
 
(benzyloxy)carbonyl
 (Cbz)
 group79,
 which
 is
 a
 easily
 accessible
 protecting
 group
 that
 serves
 to
 
prevent
 the
 N-­‐terminal
 amine
 from
 binding
 to
 other
 amino
 acids
 during
 synthesis
 as
 well
 as
 
being
 able
 to
 tolerate
 a
 wide
 range
 of
 reaction
 conditions
 (especially
 pH).
 
 Finally,
 the
 Asn
 and
 C-­‐
terminal
 propenyl
 groups
 functioning
 as
 the
 P1
 and
 P3
 residues
 were
 varied
 to
 various
 residues
 
(S1:
 n-­‐propyl,
 Nle-­‐NH2,
 Arg-­‐NH2,
 S3:
 Asn,
 Arg)
 in
 order
 to
 achieve
 specificity
 with
 the
 different
 
proteasomal
 activities.90
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

14
 

 


 
Figure
 9.
 Structural
 modifications
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 leading
 to
 BIA
 compounds.
 
 Blue:
 conversion
 of
 
biaryl
 bond
 to
 biaryl
 ether
 moiety,
 Purple:
 oxidized
 Trp
 residue
 replaced
 with
 a
 Tyr
 residue,
 
Orange:
 Tyr
 replaced
 with
 modified
 Phe,
 Green:
 inactive
 3-­‐methyl-­‐2-­‐oxopentanoyl
 modified
 to
 
Cbz
 protecting
 group,
 Red:
 C-­‐terminal
 (Z)-­‐prop-­‐1-­‐enyl
 fitting
 into
 the
 S1
 pocket
 varied
 to
 n-­‐
propyl
 and
 various
 amino
 acid
 residues,
 which
 act
 as
 the
 P1
 residue.
 
 The
 central
 Asn
 is
 retained
 
and
 acts
 as
 the
 P3
 residue,
 fitting
 into
 deep
 into
 the
 S3
 pocket.
 

 

 
Although
 these
 compounds
 were
 much
 easier
 to
 prepare,
 their
 in
 vitro
 testing
 with
 the
 
proteasome
 showed
 greatly
 reduced
 inhibitory
 potency
 compared
 to
 TMC-­‐95A.90
 
 As
 a
 result,
 
the
 design
 of
 our
 novel
 set
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 seeks
 to
 improve
 the
 potency
 of
 the
 BIA
 
structure
 with
 the
 addition
 of
 an
 electrophilic
 trap
 while
 retaining
 the
 synthetically
 facile
 biaryl
 
ether
 design
 (Figure
 10).
 
 Crystal
 structure
 data
 of
 BIA
 bound
 to
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site
 
revealed
 that
 an
 electrophilic
 group
 could
 be
 placed
 at
 the
 carbonyl
 of
 an
 amino
 acid
 residue
 at
 
the
 P1
 position
 in
 order
 to
 covalently
 bind
 to
 the
 γ-­‐hydroxyl
 of
 the
 catalytic
 N-­‐terminal
 Thr
 
residue
 of
 the
 proteasome.90
 
 Enabling
 covalent
 binding
 to
 the
 proteasome’s
 active
 site
 was
 
hypothesized
 to
 increase
 the
 inhibitory
 potency
 of
 these
 novel
 inhibitors
 to
 a
 level
 that
 is
 similar
 
to
 the
 highly
 biologically
 tuned
 TMC-­‐95A.
 
 Converting
 the
 C-­‐terminal
 (Z)-­‐prop-­‐1-­‐enyl
 group
 of
 
TMC-­‐95A
 to
 an
 amino
 acid
 residue,
 making
 the
 inhibitors
 tetrapeptides,
 also
 has
 the
 advantage
 
of
 easier
 synthetic
 modification
 of
 the
 P1
 site,
 simply
 by
 exchanging
 different
 amino
 acid
 

15
 

 


 

residues.
 
 Tetrapeptides
 with
 a
 C-­‐terminal
 reactive
 functional
 group
 have
 already
 been
 proven
 
to
 be
 effective
 proteasome
 inhibitors,
 demonstrated
 by
 the
 FDA
 approved
 carfilzomib.71
 
 
 

 


 
14
 R1
 =
 CH3,
 R2
 =
 CH2CONH2
 
17
 R1
 =
 CH3,
 R2
 =
 CH2CONH2
 

 
15
 R1
 =
 R2
 =
 i-­‐Bu
 
18
 R1
 =
 R2
 =
 i-­‐Bu
 

 
Figure
 10.
 Structures
 of
 synthetic
 targets
 14,
 15,
 17,
 and
 18.
 
 14
 and
 17
 replicate
 the
 amino
 acid
 
sequence
 of
 TMC-­‐95A,
 while
 15
 and
 18
 derive
 their
 amino
 acid
 sequence
 of
 MG-­‐132.
 

 

 
An
 aldehyde
 was
 chosen
 to
 be
 the
 electrophilic
 trap
 for
 several
 reasons.
 
 Peptide
 
aldehydes
 are
 a
 well
 established
 class
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 and
 are
 still
 the
 most
 widely
 
studied.
 
 The
 aldehyde
 forms
 a
 rapidly
 reversible
 covalent
 bond
 with
 the
 catalytic
 γ-­‐hydroxyl
 of
 
the
 active
 site
 Thr
 residue.
 
 The
 resulting
 hemiacetal
 is
 able
 to
 prevent
 proteins
 from
 accessing
 
the
 catalytic
 Thr
 residue
 responsible
 for
 performing
 the
 amide
 bond
 cleavage,
 thereby
 potently
 
inhibiting
 the
 proteolytic
 activity
 of
 the
 proteasome.
 
 Although
 aldehydes
 are
 known
 to
 inhibit
 
cysteine
 and
 serine
 proteases
 by
 the
 same
 mechanism,
 they
 have
 the
 advantage
 of
 being
 readily
 
synthetically
 available
 through
 solid
 phase
 synthesis
 using
 a
 Weinreb
 resin
 and
 LAH.
 
 An
 
aldehyde
 is
 thus
 the
 clear
 choice
 for
 investigating
 the
 proof
 of
 concept
 of
 our
 inhibitor
 design.
 
 
In
 addition,
 the
 use
 of
 an
 aldehyde
 in
 our
 design
 creates
 a
 very
 convenient
 handle
 by
 which
 we
 
can
 further
 differentiate
 the
 warhead
 in
 future
 research.
 
 
 

 

The
 P1
 and
 P3
 amino
 acid
 residues
 were
 varied
 to
 alter
 the
 specificity
 of
 the
 inhibitors
 

with
 the
 two
 most
 prominent
 binding
 pockets
 of
 the
 proteasome
 active
 sites
 (S1
 and
 S3).
 
 The
 

16
 

 


 

amino
 acid
 sequences
 were
 chosen
 to
 mimic
 the
 sequence
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 (P1=Ala,
 P3=Asn
 for
 14
 
and
 17)
 and
 MG-­‐132
 (P1=P3=Leu
 for
 15
 and
 18).
 
 MG-­‐132
 is
 an
 all
 leucine
 tripeptide
 aldehyde
 
that
 has
 been
 shown
 to
 be
 one
 of
 the
 most
 potent
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 (Ki
 =
 2-­‐4
 nM,
 49
 
nM
 in
 our
 assay).55
 
 Having
 both
 P1
 and
 P3
 Leu
 residues
 is
 advantageous
 for
 inhibiting
 the
 CT-­‐L
 
activity,
 which
 preferentially
 cleaves
 at
 large
 hydrophobic
 residues.
 
 Mirroring
 the
 amino
 acid
 
sequence
 from
 TMC-­‐95A
 was
 hypothesized
 to
 gain
 the
 most
 benefit
 from
 the
 macrocyclic
 
structure
 of
 these
 inhibitors,
 enabling
 the
 side
 chains
 of
 the
 residues
 to
 form
 the
 same
 hydrogen
 
bonding
 array
 created
 by
 TMC-­‐95A
 in
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site.
 
 Ultimately,
 both
 of
 these
 
amino
 acid
 sequences
 were
 chosen
 to
 mainly
 target
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 of
 the
 proteasome,
 which
 
has
 the
 most
 potential
 to
 exhibit
 a
 therapeutic
 effect.40-­‐42
 
 Linear
 versions
 (uncyclized
 
compounds
 17
 and
 18)
 of
 each
 inhibitor
 were
 also
 synthesized
 and
 tested
 in
 order
 to
 evaluate
 
the
 effect
 of
 the
 macrocycle
 on
 inhibiton
 of
 the
 proteasome.
 

 

Chemistry/Synthesis
 
Scheme
 1.
 Synthesis
 of
 modified
 L-­‐Phe
 7.
 a
 


 
Reagents
 and
 conditions:
 (a)
 NBS,
 AIBN,
 CCl4,
 reflux,
 24
 h.
 (b)
 diethyl
 acetamidomalonate,
 NaH,
 
DMF,
 rt,
 4
 h.
 (c)
 HCl,
 reflux,
 24
 h.
 (d)
 Ac2O,
 NaHCO3,
 dioxane,
 H2O,
 rt,
 12
 h.
 (e)
 Acylase
 I,
 pH
 7.5,
 
37
 °C,
 20
 h.
 (f)
 Cbz-­‐OSu,
 NaHCO3,
 dioxane,
 H2O,
 rt,
 12
 h.
 
a


 

17
 

 

Scheme
 2.
 Solid
 phase
 synthesis
 resulting
 in
 14,
 15,
 17,
 and
 18.a
 


 

a

Reagents
 and
 conditions:
 (a)
 (i)
 20%
 v/v
 piperidine,
 DMF,
 rt,
 30
 min;
 (ii)
 Fmoc-­‐Ala-­‐OH
 or
 Fmoc-­‐
Leu-­‐OH,
 HATU,
 DIPEA,
 DMF,
 rt,
 6
 h.
 (b)
 (i)
 20%
 v/v
 piperidine,
 DMF,
 rt,
 30
 min;
 (ii)
 Fmoc-­‐Tyr-­‐OH,
 
HATU,
 DIPEA,
 DMF,
 rt,
 2
 h.
 (c)
 (i)
 20%
 v/v
 piperidine,
 DMF,
 rt,
 30
 min;
 (ii)
 Fmoc-­‐Asn(Trt)-­‐OH
 or
 
Fmoc-­‐Leu-­‐OH,
 HATU,
 DIPEA,
 DMF,
 rt,
 2
 h.
 (d)
 (i)
 20%
 v/v
 piperidine,
 DMF,
 rt,
 30
 min;
 (ii)
 7
 (1.5
 
equiv),
 HATU,
 DIPEA,
 rt,
 2
 h.
 (e)
 K2CO3,
 CaCO3,
 3
 Ǻ
 molecular
 sieves,
 DMF,
 45
 °C,
 4
 days.
 (f)
 (i)
 
LiAlH4,
 THF,
 0
 °C,
 30
 min;
 (ii)
 KHSO4
 (sat.),
 K,
 Na
 tartrate
 (sat.),
 THF,
 rt,
 40
 min.
 (g)
 50%
 v/v
 TFA,
 
DCM,
 rt,
 1
 h.
 
 

 


 

The
 synthesis
 of
 the
 inhibitors
 consisted
 of
 the
 preparation
 of
 an
 enantiomerically
 pure
 

modified
 L-­‐Phe
 (Scheme
 1),
 coupling
 it
 to
 a
 resin
 bound
 tripeptide
 chain
 followed
 by
 cyclization
 
to
 arrive
 at
 macrocyclic
 aldehydes
 14
 and
 15,
 and
 cleavage
 from
 the
 resin
 to
 form
 the
 C-­‐terminal
 
aldehyde
 (Scheme
 2).
 
 
 
 

 

The
 tripeptide
 was
 synthesized
 using
 the
 N-­‐protected
 Weinreb
 amide
 solid
 support
 

developed
 by
 Fehrentz
 et
 al
 with
 HATU/DIPEA
 as
 coupling
 reagents.94
 
 Amino
 acid
 residues
 in
 
the
 first
 and
 third
 position
 were
 varied,
 using
 Leu
 and
 Leu
 for
 macrocyclic
 aldehyde
 15
 and
 
linear
 aldehyde
 18,
 or
 Ala
 and
 N-­‐protected
 Asn(Trt
 )
 for
 linear
 aldehyde
 17
 and
 macrocyclic
 
aldehyde
 14.
 

 

The
 modified
 L-­‐Phe
 amino
 acid
 was
 prepared
 by
 a
 method
 described
 by
 Vergne
 et
 al.95
 

Commercially
 available
 1
 was
 brominated
 using
 radical
 halogenation,
 followed
 by
 nucleophilic
 
18
 

 

substitution
 with
 diethylacetamidomalonate
 3.
 
 The
 alkylation
 product
 underwent
 
decarboxylation
 under
 acidic
 conditions,
 giving
 a
 racemic
 mixture
 of
 a
 phenylalanine
 derivative
 
4.
 
 Acylation
 and
 subsequent
 enantioseletive
 deacylation
 with
 Acylase
 I
 (from
 Asperigillus
 
melleus)
 yielded
 the
 desired
 L-­‐isomer
 6
 which
 was
 then
 Cbz-­‐protected.
 
 The
 resulting
 
phenylalanine
 analog
 7,
 was
 coupled
 to
 the
 resin
 bound
 tripeptide
 (9,
 10)
 under
 the
 conditions
 
described
 above.
 
 
 

 

For
 compounds
 14
 and
 15,
 macrocyclization
 was
 achieved
 via
 intramolecular
 

nucleophilic
 aromatic
 substitution
 under
 mildly
 basic
 conditions
 using
 a
 method
 described
 by
 
Boger
 et
 al.
 and
 adapted
 for
 solid
 phase
 synthesis
 by
 Burgess
 et
 al.96-­‐97
 
 Finally,
 cleavage
 from
 
the
 resin
 using
 LAH
 and
 deprotection
 of
 the
 Asn(Trt)
 in
 compounds
 13
 and
 16
 with
 TFA
 
furnished
 all
 four
 inhibitors.94
 
 
 

 

Enzyme
 Assays
 

 

 

The
 inhibitory
 potency
 of
 the
 resulting
 compounds
 with
 the
 proteasome
 was
 tested
 in
 

vitro
 with
 fluorometric
 reversible
 enzyme
 kinetics.
 
 The
 assays
 were
 conducted
 with
 
commercially
 available
 20S
 rabbit
 proteasome
 and
 activity-­‐specific
 (CT-­‐L)
 fluorogenic
 substrate
 
Suc-­‐LLVY-­‐AMC.
 
 Only
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 was
 measured
 due
 to
 the
 fact
 that
 it
 is
 the
 principal
 
activity
 by
 which
 the
 proteasome
 degrades
 proteins
 and
 is
 of
 primary
 concern
 when
 
investigating
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 for
 therapeutic
 purposes.40-­‐42
 
 Inhibitor
 dissolved
 in
 DMSO
 at
 
various
 concentrations
 and
 enzyme
 was
 added
 to
 wells
 containing
 buffer
 and
 substrate.
 
 
Controls
 were
 run
 simultaneously
 using
 DMSO
 in
 place
 of
 the
 inhibitor
 solutions.
 
 The
 
equilibrium
 rate
 of
 substrate
 hydrolysis
 was
 measured
 at
 380
 nm
 excitation
 and
 460
 nm
 
emission
 from
 3
 to
 10
 min
 after
 adding
 enzyme.
 
 The
 Ki
 was
 obtained
 by
 comparing
 the
 rate
 of
 
inhibited
 substrate
 degradation
 to
 a
 control
 using
 a
 non-­‐linear
 regression
 analysis
 (vi/vo
 =
 
19
 

 

1/(1+[I]/[Ki]).
 
 Similar
 reversible
 fluorometric
 enzyme
 kinetics
 was
 performed
 with
 chymotrypsin,
 
calpain,
 and
 cruzain
 in
 order
 to
 determine
 the
 specificity
 of
 these
 inhibitors
 with
 other
 cysteine
 
and
 serine
 proteases.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Results
 and
 Discussion
 

 

 

The
 overarching
 goal
 of
 this
 study
 was
 to
 improve
 the
 structure
 and
 inhibitory
 potency
 

of
 the
 BIA
 compounds.
 
 The
 primary
 alteration
 to
 the
 BIA
 structure
 was
 the
 addition
 of
 a
 C-­‐
terminal
 aldehyde,
 which
 allowed
 these
 novel
 inhibitors
 to
 covalently
 bind
 to
 the
 proteasome’s
 
catalytic
 Thr
 residue.
 
 In
 order
 to
 evaluate
 our
 success
 in
 improving
 the
 BIA
 series,
 comparisons
 
can
 be
 drawn
 between
 Ki
 values
 of
 BIA
 compounds
 with
 a
 similar
 amino
 acid
 sequence
 to
 our
 
own
 inhibitors
 (Table
 1).
 
 Our
 inhibitors
 with
 Leu
 at
 the
 P1
 and
 P3
 positions
 (15
 and
 18)
 most
 
closely
 resemble
 K-­‐3b,
 which
 has
 an
 Nle-­‐NH2
 at
 the
 P1
 position
 and
 a
 Leu
 at
 the
 P3
 position.
 
 The
 
Leu
 residue
 in
 the
 P1
 position
 of
 15
 and
 18
 is
 sufficiently
 homologous
 to
 the
 Nle
 residue
 in
 the
 
P1
 position
 of
 K-­‐3b
 due
 to
 their
 similar
 hydrophobicity,
 allowing
 a
 comparison
 to
 be
 drawn
 
between
 the
 two
 inhibitors.
 
 K-­‐3b
 was
 previously
 found
 to
 inhibit
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 at
 a
 Ki
 value
 of
 
65
 μM
 while
 compounds
 15
 and
 18
 were
 found
 to
 have
 Ki
 values
 of
 0.033
 μM
 and
 0.076
 μM
 
respectively
 for
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity.
 
 This
 result
 shows
 that
 the
 addition
 of
 the
 aldehyde
 
functionality
 increased
 potency
 2000
 fold
 for
 compound
 15
 and
 850
 fold
 for
 compound
 18.
 
 Our
 
assays
 found
 that
 these
 Leu
 containing
 compounds
 had
 comparable
 Ki
 values
 to
 the
 well
 known
 
inhibitor
 MG-­‐132,
 with
 the
 linear
 compound
 15
 inhibiting
 more
 potently.
 
 
 

 

A
 similar
 comparison
 can
 be
 drawn
 between
 K-­‐3a/BIA-­‐1a
 and
 compounds
 14
 and
 17,
 all
 

of
 which
 are
 TMC-­‐95A
 mimics.
 
 The
 amino
 acid
 sequence
 again
 only
 differs
 at
 the
 P1
 position,
 
with
 K-­‐3a/BIA-­‐1a
 containing
 an
 n-­‐propyl
 group
 and
 14
 and
 17
 containing
 an
 Ala
 residue,
 which
 is
 
similar
 in
 terms
 of
 hydrophobicity.
 
 For
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity,
 K-­‐3a/BIA-­‐1a
 was
 previously
 found
 to
 
20
 

 

have
 a
 Ki
 value
 of
 5.5
 μM
 and
 compounds
 14
 and
 17
 were
 found
 to
 have
 Ki
 values
 of
 2.0
 μM
 and
 
0.51
 μM,
 respectively.
 
 The
 addition
 of
 the
 aldehyde
 to
 these
 TMC-­‐95A
 mimics
 resulted
 in
 a
 
much
 more
 modest
 increase
 in
 potency,
 with
 a
 3
 fold
 increase
 for
 compound
 14
 and
 a
 10
 fold
 
increase
 for
 compound
 17.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Table
 1.
 Inhibition
 constants
 for
 the
 CT-­‐L
 activity.
 
Compound
 
TMC-­‐95A87
 
MG-­‐132
 
K-­‐3a/BIA-­‐1a89
 
K-­‐3b89
 
14
 
15
 
17
 
18
 

Linear/cyclic,
 mode
 of
 inhibition
 
 
cyclic,
 noncovalent
 
linear,
 covalent
 
cyclic,
 noncovalent
 
cyclic,
 noncovalent
 
cyclic,
 covalent
 
cyclic,
 covalent
 
linear,
 covalent
 
linear,
 covalent
 

P1
 
 
propenyl
 
Leu
 
n-­‐propyl
 
Nle
 
Ala
 
Leu
 
Ala
 
Leu
 

P3
 
Ki
 CT-­‐L
 (μM)
 
Asn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.0054
 
Leu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.049
 
Asn
 

 
 
 
 
 
 5.5
 
Leu
 
65
 
Asn
 

 
 
 
 
 
 2.0
 
Leu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.076
 
Asn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.51
 
Leu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.033
 


 

 

It
 is
 puzzling
 that
 the
 addition
 of
 an
 aldehyde
 led
 compounds
 15
 and
 18
 to
 be
 three
 

orders
 of
 magnitude
 more
 potent
 than
 the
 comparable
 BIA
 compound,
 while
 aldehyde
 
functionality
 on
 compounds
 14
 and
 17
 led
 to
 only
 a
 slight
 increase
 in
 potency.
 
 The
 cause
 of
 this
 
discrepancy
 must
 stem
 from
 the
 differences
 in
 the
 P1
 and
 P3
 residues.
 
 Groll
 et
 al.
 suggest
 that
 
the
 deep
 insertion
 of
 the
 P3
 Asn
 residue
 into
 the
 S3
 pocket
 is
 the
 most
 significant
 interaction
 in
 
describing
 the
 binding
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 to
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site
 while
 the
 interaction
 of
 the
 n-­‐
propylene
 in
 the
 P1
 position
 only
 weakly
 interacts
 with
 the
 S1
 pocket.79
 
 However,
 several
 
studies
 have
 demonstrated
 that
 the
 P3
 residue
 can
 be
 varied
 to
 several
 different
 types
 of
 
residues
 and
 still
 potently
 inhibit
 the
 proteasome,
 though
 the
 S3
 pocket
 of
 the
 β5
 subunit
 (CT-­‐L)
 
seems
 to
 preferentially
 accommodate
 large
 hydrophobic
 residues
 such
 as
 Leu,
 2-­‐Nal,
 and
 
Glu(OtBu).55,
 98-­‐99
 
 Since
 the
 S3
 pocket
 can
 favorably
 accommodate
 several
 types
 of
 large
 
residues,
 including
 Asn
 and
 Leu,
 the
 discrepancy
 in
 the
 inhibitory
 potency
 of
 the
 Leu
 containing
 

21
 

 

cyclic
 15
 and
 linear
 18
 and
 the
 Asn
 containg
 cyclic
 14
 and
 linear
 17
 is
 unlikely
 to
 be
 due
 to
 the
 
variance
 of
 the
 P3
 residue.
 
 
 

 

The
 differing
 potencies
 are
 thus
 more
 likely
 to
 be
 explained
 by
 the
 identity
 of
 the
 P1
 

residue.
 
 The
 addition
 of
 an
 electrophilic
 group
 on
 the
 C-­‐terminus
 of
 a
 peptide
 inhibitor
 thus
 
appears
 to
 drastically
 increase
 the
 importance
 of
 the
 P1
 residue.
 
 We
 hypothesize
 that
 this
 
effect
 is
 due
 to
 the
 interaction
 between
 the
 P1
 and
 the
 S1
 pocket
 functioning
 as
 an
 anchor
 that
 
keeps
 the
 warhead
 in
 close
 proximity
 to
 the
 catalytic
 Thr
 residue
 of
 the
 active
 site.
 
 This
 P1-­‐S1
 
interaction
 would
 not
 only
 serve
 to
 initially
 direct
 the
 aldehyde
 to
 the
 Thr
 residue,
 but
 also
 to
 
slow
 the
 dissociation
 of
 the
 reversible
 covalent
 bond
 that
 forms.
 
 Creating
 a
 strong
 interaction
 at
 
the
 S1
 site
 would
 thus
 drive
 equilibrium
 toward
 formation
 of
 the
 hemiacetal,
 increasing
 the
 
binding
 affinity
 of
 the
 inhibitor.
 
 The
 potency
 of
 peptide
 aldehyde
 inhibitors
 would
 thus
 be
 
highly
 dependent
 on
 the
 identity
 of
 the
 P1
 residue,
 which
 is
 reflected
 in
 our
 kinetic
 data.
 
 This
 
phenomenon
 explains
 why
 the
 compounds
 with
 a
 Leu
 in
 the
 P1
 position
 (15
 and
 18)
 were
 much
 
more
 potent
 than
 (15-­‐25
 fold)
 the
 ones
 containing
 an
 Ala
 in
 the
 P1
 position
 (14
 and
 17).
 
 
Previous
 work
 by
 Adams
 et
 al.
 showed
 that
 the
 length
 and
 size
 of
 the
 P1
 residue
 of
 tripeptide
 
aldehydes
 greatly
 affected
 the
 potency
 in
 proteasome
 inhibition.55
 
 It
 was
 found
 that
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Leu
 >
 Ala
 >
 Gly
 for
 the
 P1
 position,
 with
 Ala
 having
 a
 20
 fold
 increase
 of
 potency
 compared
 to
 
Gly,
 and
 Leu
 having
 a
 50
 fold
 increase
 over
 Ala.
 
 This
 trend
 demonstrates
 that
 the
 S1
 pocket
 of
 
the
 β5
 subunit
 preferentially
 accommodates
 larger
 hydrophobic
 residues.
 
 Gly
 and
 Ala
 residues
 
cannot
 form
 a
 strong
 interaction
 with
 the
 S1
 pocket
 due
 to
 their
 small
 size,
 whereas
 Leu
 is
 
capable
 of
 forming
 a
 strong
 interaction.
 
 Various
 studies
 have
 also
 found
 Leu
 to
 be
 an
 ideal
 
residue
 for
 the
 P1
 position,
 including
 both
 bortezomib
 and
 carfilzomib
 (Figure
 5).55,
 98
 
 
 

 

Finally,
 it
 was
 found
 that
 the
 macrocycle
 in
 compounds
 in
 14
 and
 15
 showed
 a
 small
 

decrease
 in
 potency
 (2-­‐4
 fold)
 compared
 to
 their
 linear
 analogues
 17
 and
 18.
 
 This
 result
 is
 
22
 

 

especially
 surprising
 considering
 that
 previous
 work
 has
 identified
 the
 macrocycle
 in
 TMC-­‐95A
 to
 
be
 integral
 to
 its
 high
 affinity
 for
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site.79
 
 It
 is
 unclear
 exactly
 why
 the
 
macrocycle
 does
 not
 increase
 the
 potency
 of
 our
 inhibitors,
 but
 there
 are
 a
 few
 plausible
 
explanations.
 
 The
 macrocycle
 in
 TMC-­‐95A
 could
 be
 responsible
 for
 stabilizing
 the
 hydrogen
 
bonding
 that
 occurs
 between
 the
 active
 site
 and
 the
 oxidized
 Trp
 residue
 (Figure
 7).
 
 Our
 
inhibitors
 replace
 the
 oxidized
 Trp
 with
 a
 Tyr
 residue
 and
 thus
 lack
 the
 ability
 to
 form
 these
 
hydrogen
 bonds,
 thereby
 diminishing
 the
 need
 for
 the
 macrocycle.
 
 A
 likely
 explanation
 could
 
also
 be
 that
 the
 biphenyl
 ether
 linkage
 disrupts
 the
 interaction
 of
 the
 P2
 and
 P4
 aryl
 groups
 with
 
the
 S2
 and
 S4
 pockets.
 
 Previous
 modeling
 showed
 that
 the
 biaryl
 ether
 moiety
 of
 the
 BIA
 
compounds
 is
 distorted
 in
 a
 rather
 different
 manner
 than
 the
 biaryl
 moiety
 in
 TMC-­‐95A.90
 
 In
 
addition,
 the
 two
 aryl
 groups
 in
 the
 BIA
 compounds
 are
 spaced
 farther
 apart
 from
 each
 other
 in
 
the
 BIA
 compounds
 compared
 to
 the
 aryl
 groups
 in
 TMC-­‐95A.
 
 These
 differences
 may
 lead
 to
 a
 
disruption
 of
 the
 P2-­‐S2
 and
 P4-­‐S4
 interactions
 in
 the
 cyclized
 inhibitors
 (14
 and
 15)
 whereas
 the
 
aryl
 groups
 of
 the
 uncyclized
 inhibitors
 (17
 and
 18)
 can
 freely
 associate
 with
 the
 S2
 and
 S4
 
pockets.
 
 The
 SAR
 study
 that
 produced
 the
 structure
 of
 carfilzomib
 found
 that
 unrestricted
 aryl
 
groups
 are
 ideal
 for
 the
 P2
 and
 P4
 positions,
 which
 demonstrates
 that
 these
 interactions
 may
 be
 
more
 important
 than
 previously
 thought.
 
 Finally,
 our
 cyclized
 inhibitors
 may
 form
 atropisomers
 
about
 the
 biaryl
 ether
 moiety.
 
 If
 this
 is
 the
 case,
 one
 of
 the
 atropisomers
 may
 be
 much
 less
 
potent
 at
 inhibiting
 the
 proteasome
 active
 site,
 leading
 the
 Ki
 value
 to
 be
 an
 average
 between
 
the
 two
 isomers.
 
 Co-­‐crystalization
 of
 these
 inhibitors
 with
 the
 proteasome
 and
 docking
 studies
 
must
 be
 carried
 out
 to
 address
 these
 issues.
 
 
 
 

 

Since
 peptide
 aldehydes
 are
 prone
 to
 inhibiting
 cysteine
 and
 serine
 proteases,
 we
 also
 

performed
 kinetics
 on
 chymotrypsin,
 calpain,
 and
 cruzain
 to
 gauge
 the
 selectivity
 of
 our
 
inhibitors
 (Table
 2).
 
 
 
23
 

 

Table
 2.
 Comparing
 inhibition
 constants
 of
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 to
 other
 proteases.
 

 
Compound
 
14
 
15
 
17
 
18
 

 


 
 
P1
 
Ala
 
Leu
 
Ala
 
Leu
 


 

 
P3
 
Proteasome
 
(CT-­‐L)
 
Asn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 2.0
 
Leu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.076
 
 
Asn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.51
 
Leu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 0.033
 

Ki
 (μM)
 
Chymotrypsin
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 16
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 93
 

 
 
 
 
 1500
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 500
 


 
Calpain
 
17
 
11
 
N.I.
 
35
 


 
Cruzain
 

 
 
 
 0.56
 

 
 
 
 0.41
 

 
 5.4
 
19.5
 

Chymotrypsin,
 a
 serine
 protease,
 preferentially
 cleaves
 at
 the
 site
 of
 large
 aryl-­‐containing
 
residues,
 though
 it
 can
 also
 cleave
 at
 smaller
 hydrophobic
 residues
 such
 as
 Leu.100
 
 The
 substrate
 
specificity
 is
 mainly
 determined
 by
 the
 hydrophobic
 S1
 pocket
 in
 the
 active
 site.
 
 The
 results
 
show
 that
 the
 Asn
 containing
 compounds
 (14
 and
 17)
 show
 almost
 no
 inhibition
 of
 the
 enzyme
 
(Ki>500
 μM),
 which
 is
 most
 likely
 due
 the
 inability
 of
 the
 small
 Ala
 residue
 in
 the
 P1
 position
 to
 
significantly
 interact
 with
 the
 large
 S1
 pocket
 and
 the
 repulsive
 effects
 between
 the
 polar
 Asn
 
residue
 and
 the
 hydrophobic
 active
 site.
 
 The
 Leu
 containing
 compounds
 (15
 and
 18)
 predictably
 
show
 a
 greater
 inhibition
 of
 chymotrypsin,
 due
 to
 the
 Leu
 being
 able
 to
 favorably
 interact
 with
 
the
 S1
 site.
 
 However,
 the
 cyclized
 compound
 15
 was
 more
 than
 10
 fold
 less
 potent
 than
 its
 
uncyclized
 analogue
 18,
 perhaps
 due
 to
 the
 inflexible
 bulk
 of
 the
 macrocycle.
 

 

Calpain
 is
 a
 cysteine
 protease
 that
 preferentially
 cleaves
 peptides
 with
 a
 small
 

hydrophobic
 group
 in
 the
 P2
 position
 and
 a
 large
 hydrophobic
 group
 at
 the
 P1
 position.101
 
 All
 of
 
our
 inhibitors
 showed
 modest
 inhibition
 of
 calpain
 (Ki>10
 μM),
 while
 compound
 17
 showed
 no
 
inhibition.
 
 The
 poor
 inhibition
 of
 calpain
 is
 once
 again
 due
 to
 a
 mismatch
 between
 the
 amino
 
acid
 sequence
 of
 our
 inhibitors
 and
 the
 substrate
 specificity
 of
 calpain.
 
 It
 is
 likely
 that
 the
 polar
 
Asn
 residue
 in
 14
 and
 17
 seems
 to
 exacerbate
 this
 effect
 because
 of
 the
 hydrophobic
 active
 site.
 

 

Cruzain,
 a
 cysteine
 protease
 found
 in
 parasitic
 protozoa
 Trypanosoma
 cruzi,
 was
 

inhibited
 at
 submicromolar
 concentrations
 with
 the
 Leu
 containing
 compounds
 (15
 and
 18),
 
while
 the
 Asn
 containing
 compounds
 (14
 and
 17)
 were
 less
 potent.
 
 Though
 much
 is
 still
 being
 
24
 

 

discovered
 about
 the
 substrate
 specificity
 of
 cruzain,
 many
 studies
 have
 concluded
 that
 the
 
active
 site
 preferentially
 accommodates
 aromatic
 residues
 and
 residues
 with
 long
 side
 chains.102-­‐
104


 
 One
 study
 found
 that
 cruzain
 preferentially
 cleaves
 peptides
 with
 Arg
 or
 benzyl-­‐Cys
 in
 the
 P1
 

position
 and
 hydrophobic
 groups
 at
 the
 P2
 position.105
 
 The
 active
 site’s
 preference
 for
 bulkier
 
hydrophobic
 residues
 would
 explain
 why
 15
 and
 18
 showed
 greater
 potency
 than
 14
 and
 17,
 
which
 contain
 a
 small
 P1
 residue
 and
 a
 polar
 P3
 residue.
 
 
 

 

Overall,
 the
 inhibitors
 were
 much
 more
 specific
 for
 the
 proteasome
 than
 for
 other
 

proteases.
 
 The
 uncyclized
 Asn-­‐containing
 17
 was
 especially
 promising,
 with
 little
 to
 no
 
inhibition
 for
 both
 calpain
 and
 chymotrypsin.
 
 Additionally,
 compound
 15
 inhibited
 the
 
proteasome
 at
 nearly
 100
 times
 more
 potently
 than
 chymotrypsin,
 which
 has
 similar
 substrate
 
specificities.
 
 This
 result
 demonstrates
 that
 the
 addition
 of
 a
 macrocycle
 can
 significantly
 reduce
 
the
 chance
 of
 off
 target
 effects
 for
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 due
 to
 its
 inflexible
 bulkiness.
 
 

 

 

Conclusion:
 

 

 

All
 four
 inhibitors
 showed
 increased
 potency
 of
 the
 proteasome
 CT-­‐L
 activity
 compared
 

to
 the
 noncovalent
 BIA
 compounds.
 
 However,
 the
 Leu
 containing
 compounds
 15
 and
 18
 were
 
found
 to
 benefit
 much
 more
 from
 the
 addition
 of
 the
 aldehyde
 than
 the
 TMC-­‐95A
 mimics,
 14
 
and
 17.
 
 We
 hypothesize
 that
 this
 discrepancy
 can
 be
 mainly
 attributed
 to
 the
 fact
 that
 the
 P1-­‐
S1
 interaction
 becomes
 significantly
 more
 important
 in
 the
 presence
 of
 a
 C-­‐terminal
 aldehyde
 
due
 to
 the
 capability
 of
 the
 P1
 to
 anchor
 the
 aldehyde
 close
 to
 the
 catalytic
 Thr
 residue.
 
 The
 Ala
 
in
 the
 P1
 position
 of
 14
 and
 17
 is
 not
 sufficiently
 bulky
 to
 create
 a
 substantial
 interaction
 with
 
the
 S1
 pocket,
 thereby
 diminishing
 the
 effectiveness
 of
 the
 aldehyde.
 
 As
 several
 other
 studies
 
have
 affirmed,
 a
 Leu
 in
 the
 P1
 position
 appears
 to
 be
 ideal
 for
 interacting
 with
 S1
 pocket
 of
 the
 
CT-­‐L
 activity,
 which
 explains
 why
 compounds
 15
 and
 18
 were
 the
 most
 potent.
 
 Linear
 
25
 

 

compound
 15
 was
 found
 to
 inhibit
 more
 potently
 than
 the
 notable
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 MG-­‐
132.
 
 
 

 

Both
 cyclic
 compounds
 were
 found
 to
 be
 slightly
 less
 potent
 than
 their
 linear
 analogues.
 
 

This
 effect
 may
 be
 explained
 by
 the
 interruption
 of
 the
 P2-­‐S2
 and
 P4-­‐S4
 interactions
 by
 the
 
biaryl
 ether
 moiety
 or
 by
 the
 presence
 of
 atropisomers.
 
 Ultimately,
 crystallographic
 and
 docking
 
studies
 must
 be
 performed
 in
 order
 to
 elucidate
 this
 result.
 
 

 

These
 inhibitors
 were
 found
 to
 be
 much
 more
 specific
 for
 the
 proteasome
 than
 

chymotrypsin,
 calpain,
 and
 cruzain.
 
 The
 uncyclized
 Asn
 containing
 compound
 17
 was
 found
 to
 
have
 very
 little
 activity
 with
 the
 proteases
 tested
 mainly
 due
 to
 the
 amino
 acid
 sequence
 being
 
unsuitable
 for
 the
 protease
 active
 sites.
 
 Compound
 15
 demonstrated
 that
 the
 macrocycle
 can
 
create
 steric
 resistance
 to
 the
 active
 sites
 of
 some
 proteases.
 
 The
 general
 structure
 of
 these
 
inhibitors
 appears
 to
 limit
 their
 ability
 to
 inhibit
 other
 proteases,
 making
 them
 advantageous
 for
 
proteasome
 inhibition.
 

 

Experimental
 

 
Materials
 

 

All
 reagents
 were
 purchased
 from
 VWR
 international.
 
 Weinreb
 resin
 and
 amino
 acids
 

for
 solid
 phase
 synthesis
 were
 purchased
 from
 Aroz
 Technologies.
 
 Silica
 for
 column
 
chromatography
 was
 purchased
 from
 Sigma-­‐Aldrich
 and
 TLC
 plates
 were
 purchased
 from
 EMD
 
chemicals.
 
 Purification
 of
 final
 compounds
 was
 performed
 via
 reverse-­‐phase
 HPLC
 with
 an
 
(Agilent
 Technologies
 1260
 Infinity)
 and
 a
 (SUPELCO
 Discovery
 HS)
 C18
 Column
 using
 a
 gradient
 
with
 ACN/H2O
 that
 increased
 from
 30-­‐70%
 ACN
 over
 50
 min.
 
 Mass
 spec.
 data
 was
 obtained
 via
 
LC/MS
 using
 an
 (Agilent
 Technologies
 Infinity
 1220)
 and
 (6120
 Quadrupole).
 
 1H
 NMR
 spectra
 
were
 obtained
 from
 a
 Bruker
 Avance
 III
 400
 MHz
 Ultrashield
 Plus
 Spectrometer.
 
 20S
 rabbit
 
26
 

 

proteasome
 was
 purchased
 from
 Sigma
 Aldrich
 and
 the
 proteasome
 substrates
 were
 purchased
 
from
 Calbiochem.
 
 Chymotrypsin,
 calpain,
 and
 cruzain
 were
 isolated
 and
 supplied
 by
 
collaborators.
 
 All
 kinetic
 assays
 were
 run
 in
 a
 96
 well
 plate
 and
 read
 by
 a
 BioTek
 Flx800
 Plate
 
reader.
 
 
 
 

 
Methods
 
3-­‐Fluro-­‐4-­‐nitrobenzylbromide
 (2):
 commercially
 available
 3-­‐fluoro-­‐4-­‐nitrotoluene
 (1)
 (4.24
 g,
 
27.3
 mmol)
 was
 dissolved
 in
 CCl4
 (100
 ml).
 
 N-­‐bromosuccinimide
 (4.864
 g,
 27.32
 mmol)
 and
 AIBN
 
(0.502
 g,
 3.057
 mmol)
 was
 added
 and
 the
 solution
 was
 refluxed
 at
 90
 ˚C
 for
 24
 hrs.
 
 The
 yellow
 
precipitate
 that
 formed
 was
 filtered
 off
 and
 the
 solvent
 was
 removed
 under
 reduced
 pressure
 to
 
give
 a
 yellow
 liquid.
 
 Purification
 via
 column
 chromatography
 (7:1
 pet
 ether/EtOAc)
 yielded
 2
 
(2.814
 g,
 43.9%
 yield)
 as
 a
 yellow
 oil.
 1H
 NMR
 (400
 MHz,
 CDCl3):
 δ
 4.14
 (qrt,
 2H,
 Ph-­‐CH2Br),
 7.32
 
(d,
 1H,
 FC=CH),
 7.35
 (d,
 1H,
 O2N-­‐C=CH-­‐CH),
 8.08
 (t,
 1H,
 NO2-­‐C=CH).
 

 
Ethyl
 2-­‐(acetylamino)-­‐2-­‐(ethoxycarbonyl)-­‐3-­‐(3’-­‐fluoro-­‐4’-­‐nitrophenyl)propanoate
 (3):
 
Diethylacetamidomalonate
 (5.042
 g,
 23.21
 mmol)
 was
 dissolved
 DMF
 (20
 ml).
 
 Sodium
 hydride
 
(0.836
 g,
 34.82
 mmol)
 was
 washed
 with
 pentane
 and
 suspended
 in
 DMF
 (10
 ml)
 and
 added
 to
 
the
 solution
 under
 argon.
 
 A
 solution
 of
 2
 (5.432
 g,
 23.21
 mmol)
 in
 DMF
 (10
 ml)
 was
 then
 added.
 
 
The
 solution
 was
 stirred
 for
 4
 hrs
 at
 room
 temperature.
 
 Upon
 completion,
 the
 solvent
 was
 
removed
 under
 reduced
 pressure
 and
 the
 remaining
 solid
 was
 dissolved
 in
 EtOAc
 and
 
precipitated
 out
 with
 the
 addition
 of
 hexane.
 
 
 The
 solvent
 was
 filtered
 off
 to
 give
 3
 (7.19
 g,
 
83.6%
 yield)
 as
 a
 white
 solid.
 1H
 NMR
 (400
 MHz,
 DMSO):
 δ
 1.33
 (t,
 6H,
 O-­‐CH2-­‐CH3),
 2.08
 (s,
 3H,
 
NH-­‐CO-­‐CH3),
 3.78
 (s,
 2H,
 Ph-­‐CH),
 4.31
 (qrt,
 4H,
 O-­‐CH2-­‐CH3),
 6.61
 (s,
 1H,
 NH),
 6.96
 (d,
 1H,
 F-­‐
C=CH),
 6.96
 (d,
 1H,
 O2N-­‐C=CH-­‐CH),
 8.00
 (t,
 1H,
 O2NC=CH).
 
 
 
27
 

 


 
(R,S)-­‐3-­‐fluoro-­‐4-­‐nitrophenylalanine
 Hydrochloride
 (4):
 Compound
 3
 (7.19
 g,
 19.41
 mmol)
 was
 
suspended
 in
 concentrated
 HCl
 (65
 ml)
 and
 refluxed
 for
 24
 hrs.
 
 The
 solvent
 was
 removed
 under
 
reduced
 pressure
 and
 the
 crude
 residue
 was
 co-­‐evaporated
 three
 times
 with
 toluene
 and
 once
 
with
 t-­‐butylmethyl
 ether
 to
 give
 4
 (5.591
 g,
 >99%
 yield)
 as
 a
 white
 solid.
 1H
 NMR
 (400
 MHz,
 
DMSO):
 δ
 3.19
 (m,
 2H,
 Ph-­‐CH2),
 4.33
 (t,
 1H,
 α-­‐H),
 7.37
 (d,
 1H,
 F-­‐C=CH),
 7.57
 (d,
 1H,
 O2N-­‐C=CH-­‐
CH),
 8.16
 (t,
 1H,
 O2NC=CH).
 
 
 

 
(R,S)-­‐N-­‐Acetyl-­‐3-­‐fluoro-­‐4-­‐nitrophenylalanine
 (5):
 Compound
 4
 (3.234
 g,
 12.22
 mmol)
 was
 
dissolved
 in
 H2O/dioxane
 (1:1,
 20
 ml).
 
 The
 pH
 of
 the
 solution
 was
 adjusted
 to
 8-­‐9
 with
 the
 
addition
 of
 solid
 NaHCO3.
 
 Acetic
 anhydride
 (3.743
 g,
 36.66
 mmol)
 was
 added
 and
 the
 reaction
 
was
 stirred
 at
 room
 temperature
 overnight.
 
 The
 volatiles
 were
 evaporated
 and
 the
 residue
 was
 
redissolved
 in
 EtOAc
 after
 being
 acidified
 with
 5%
 KHSO4
 and
 HCl.
 
 The
 EtOAc
 layer
 was
 then
 
washed
 with
 KHSO4
 (5%,
 3
 x
 20
 ml)
 and
 brine
 (3
 x
 20
 ml)
 and
 dried
 with
 MgSO4.
 
 The
 solvent
 was
 
removed
 under
 reduced
 pressure
 to
 give
 5
 (2.50
 g,
 75.7%
 yield)
 as
 a
 yellow
 powder.
 1H
 NMR
 
(400
 MHz,
 DMSO):
 δ
 1.78
 (s,
 3H,
 CH3),
 2.97
 (dd,
 1H,
 Ph(3F,
 4NO2)-­‐CHa),
 3.20
 (dd,
 1H,
 Ph(3F,
 
4NO2)-­‐CHb),
 4.51
 (m,
 1H,
 α-­‐H),
 7.32
 (d,
 1H,
 F-­‐C=CH),
 7.47
 (d,
 1H,
 O2N-­‐C=CH-­‐CH),
 8.10
 (t,
 1H,
 
O2NC=CH).
 
 
 

 
 
(S)-­‐3-­‐Fluoro-­‐4-­‐nitrophenylalanine
 (6):
 Compound
 5
 
 (3.04
 g,
 11.25
 mmol)
 was
 suspended
 in
 
phosphate
 buffer
 (0.1
 M,
 pH
 7.5,
 100
 ml)
 and
 then
 dissolved
 with
 the
 addition
 of
 aqueous
 KOH
 
(0.1M,
 1
 eq).
 
 The
 solution
 was
 then
 diluted
 with
 additional
 phosphate
 buffer
 (0.1
 M,
 pH
 7.5,
 
630
 ml).
 
 Acylase
 I
 of
 Asperigillus
 melleus
 (>0.5
 U/mg,
 2.89
 g)
 was
 added
 and
 the
 reaction
 was
 
incubated
 for
 20
 hrs
 at
 37˚
 C.
 
 The
 enzyme
 was
 then
 removed
 by
 amicon
 filtration
 (cutoff
 >
 10
 
28
 

 

kDA).
 
 The
 filtrate
 was
 acidified
 to
 pH
 2-­‐3
 with
 HCL
 (0.5
 N)
 and
 the
 undesired
 R-­‐isomer
 was
 
extracted
 with
 EtOAc.
 
 The
 pH
 was
 increased
 to
 7
 using
 1
 N
 NaOH.
 
 The
 solvent
 was
 removed
 
under
 reduced
 pressure
 until
 only
 a
 small
 amount
 of
 liquid
 remained.
 
 The
 S-­‐isomer
 was
 
precipitated
 overnight
 at
 4˚
 C
 to
 give
 a
 brown
 powder
 6
 (1.08
 g,
 84.0%
 yield)
 as
 a
 brown
 
powder.
 1H
 NMR
 (400
 MHz,
 DMSO):
 δ
 3.00
 (m,
 2H,
 Ph-­‐CH2),
 4.03
 (t,
 1H,
 α-­‐H),
 7.32
 (d,
 1H,
 F-­‐
C=CH),
 7.48
 (d,
 1H,
 O2N-­‐C=CH-­‐CH),
 8.08
 (t,
 1H,
 O2NC=CH).
 
 
 

 
(S)-­‐N-­‐Benzyloxycarbonyl-­‐3-­‐fluoro-­‐4-­‐nitrophenylalanine
 (7):
 The
 amino
 acid
 analog
 6
 (1.31
 g,
 
7.95
 mmol)
 was
 dissolved
 in
 H2O/dioxane
 (1:1,
 10
 ml).
 
 The
 pH
 of
 the
 solution
 was
 adjusted
 to
 8-­‐
9
 with
 addition
 of
 solid
 NaHCO3.
 
 Cbz-­‐succinimide
 (1.98
 g,
 7.95
 mmol)
 was
 added
 and
 the
 
reaction
 was
 stirred
 at
 room
 temperature
 overnight.
 
 The
 volatiles
 were
 removed
 under
 
reduced
 pressure
 and
 the
 product
 was
 dissolved
 in
 EtOAc
 following
 acidification
 with
 KHSO4
 
(5%)
 and
 HCl.
 
 The
 volatiles
 were
 once
 again
 removed
 under
 reduced
 pressure
 to
 give
 7
 (1.85
 g,
 
64.2%
 yield)
 as
 a
 yellow
 solid.
 1H
 NMR
 (400
 MHz,
 DMSO):
 δ
 2.96
 (dd,
 1H,
 Ph(3F,
 4NO2)-­‐CHa),
 
3.23
 (dd,
 1H,
 Ph(3F,
 4NO2)-­‐CHb),
 4.30
 (m,
 1H,
 α-­‐H),
 5.00
 (s,
 2H,
 Ph-­‐CH2),
 7.24-­‐7.38
 (m,
 5H,
 PhCbz),
 
7.49
 (d,
 1H,
 F-­‐C=CH),
 7.68
 (d,
 1H,
 O2N-­‐C=CH-­‐CH),
 8.07
 (t,
 1H,
 O2NC=CH).
 
 
 

 
 
Z-­‐Phe(3-­‐F,
 4-­‐NO2)-­‐Asn(Trt)-­‐Tyr-­‐Ala-­‐resin
 (11):
 Weinreb
 resin
 (3.086
 g,
 0.72
 mmol/g,
 2.22
 mmol)
 
was
 swelled
 in
 DMF
 (40
 ml)
 for
 1
 hr
 and
 subsequently
 deprotected
 in
 20%
 diethylamine/DMF
 
(30
 ml)
 for
 30
 min.
 
 A
 chloranil
 test
 was
 run
 to
 ensure
 deprotection
 and
 the
 beads
 were
 washed
 
three
 times
 with
 DMF.
 
 Fmoc-­‐Ala-­‐OH
 (2.76
 g,
 8.88
 mmol),
 HATU
 (3.37
 g,
 8.88
 mmol),
 and
 DIPEA
 
(2.88
 g,
 22.2
 mmol)
 were
 added
 with
 DMF
 (40
 ml)
 to
 the
 deprotected
 resin.
 
 The
 reaction
 was
 
shaken
 for
 6
 hrs
 at
 which
 time
 a
 Kaiser
 test
 was
 run
 to
 ensure
 coupling
 had
 occurred.
 
 Fmoc-­‐Tyr-­‐
OH
 (3.58
 g,
 8.88
 mmol)
 and
 Fmoc-­‐Asn(Trt)-­‐OH
 (5.29
 g,
 8.88
 mmol)
 and
 7
 (1.39
 g,
 3.67
 mmol)
 
29
 

 

were
 consecutively
 coupled
 to
 the
 resin
 using
 the
 same
 deprotection
 and
 coupling
 conditions,
 
washing
 the
 resin
 several
 times
 with
 DMF
 between
 each
 coupling.
 
 The
 beads
 were
 then
 washed
 
with
 DMF
 (4x)
 and
 DCM
 (4x)
 after
 the
 finally
 coupling,
 dried
 via
 vacuum
 suction,
 and
 stored
 at
 4
 
˚C
 under
 argon.
 

 
Macrocyclization
 to
 Z-­‐Phe(4-­‐NO2)-­‐Asn(Trt)-­‐Tyr-­‐Ala-­‐resin:
 The
 resin
 bound
 8
 was
 transferred
 to
 
a
 flask
 with
 DMF
 (50
 ml).
 
 CaCO3
 (2.22
 g,
 22.2
 mmol)
 and
 K2CO3
 (3.07
 g,
 22.2
 mmol)
 were
 added
 
with
 3
 Å
 molecular
 sieves
 (100
 mg).The
 reaction
 was
 stirred
 for
 4
 days
 at
 45
 ˚C.
 
 The
 beads
 were
 
decanted
 from
 the
 molecular
 sieves
 and
 salt
 precipitate
 and
 subsequently
 washed
 with
 DMF
 
(4x)
 and
 several
 times
 with
 DCM.
 
 The
 beads
 were
 dried
 and
 stored
 under
 argon
 at
 4
 ˚C.
 
 
 

 
Z-­‐Phe(3-­‐F,
 4-­‐NO2)-­‐Leu-­‐Tyr-­‐Leu-­‐resin
 (12):
 Weinreb
 resin
 (2.92
 
 g,
 0.76
 mmol/g,
 2.22
 mmol)
 was
 
swelled
 in
 DMF
 (40
 ml)
 for
 1
 hr
 and
 subsequently
 deprotected
 in
 20%
 diethylamine/DMF
 (30
 ml)
 
for
 30
 min.
 
 A
 chloranil
 test
 was
 run
 to
 ensure
 deprotection
 and
 the
 beads
 were
 washed
 three
 
times
 with
 DMF.
 
 Fmoc-­‐Leu-­‐OH
 (3.14
 g,
 8.88
 mmol),
 HATU
 (3.37
 g,
 8.88
 mmol),
 and
 DIPEA
 (2.88
 
g,
 22.2
 mmol)
 were
 added
 with
 DMF
 (40
 ml)
 to
 the
 deprotected
 resin.
 
 The
 reaction
 was
 shaken
 
for
 6
 hrs
 at
 which
 time
 a
 Kaiser
 test
 was
 run
 to
 ensure
 coupling
 had
 occurred.
 
 Fmoc-­‐Tyr-­‐OH
 
(3.58
 g,
 8.88
 mmol)
 and
 Fmoc-­‐Leu-­‐OH
 (3.14
 g,
 8.88
 mmol)
 and
 7
 (1.73
 g,
 4.77
 mmol)
 were
 
consecutively
 coupled
 to
 the
 resin
 using
 the
 same
 deprotection
 and
 coupling
 conditions,
 
washing
 the
 resin
 several
 times
 with
 DMF
 between
 each
 coupling.
 
 The
 beads
 were
 then
 washed
 
with
 DMF
 (4x)
 and
 DCM
 (4x)
 after
 the
 finally
 coupling,
 dried
 via
 vacuum
 suction,
 and
 stored
 at
 4
 
˚C
 under
 argon.
 

 
Macrocyclization
 to
 Z-­‐Phe(4-­‐NO2)-­‐Leu-­‐Tyr-­‐Leu-­‐resin
 
30
 

 


 
Cleavage
 from
 resin
 to
 Z-­‐Phe(4-­‐NO2)-­‐Asn(Trt)-­‐Tyr-­‐Ala-­‐H
 (13):
 The
 resin
 bound
 9
 was
 swelled
 
with
 dry
 THF
 (30
 ml)
 for
 1
 hr
 and
 then
 cooled
 to
 0
 ˚C.
 
 LAH
 (0.421
 g,
 11.1
 mmol)
 was
 dissolved
 in
 
dry
 THF
 (10
 ml)
 and
 the
 solution
 was
 added
 dropwise
 to
 the
 suspended
 resin.
 
 After
 30
 min,
 the
 
reaction
 was
 quenched
 with
 saturated
 KHSO4
 (11.1
 ml)
 and
 K2NaTartate
 (8.42
 ml)
 solutions
 and
 
the
 reaction
 mixture
 was
 allowed
 to
 warm
 to
 room
 temperature.
 
 The
 THF
 layer
 was
 isolated
 
and
 the
 remaining
 beads
 and
 aqueous
 layer
 were
 washed
 several
 times
 with
 THF.
 
 The
 THF
 
layers
 were
 combined,
 washed
 with
 brine
 (3x),
 dried
 with
 MgSO4,
 and
 the
 volatiles
 were
 
removed
 under
 reduced
 pressure
 to
 give
 10
 (0.835
 g,
 41.0%
 yield)
 as
 a
 yellow
 solid.
 
 
 

 
Deprotection
 of
 Asn(Trt)
 to
 Z-­‐Phe(4-­‐NO2)-­‐Asn-­‐Tyr-­‐Ala-­‐H
 (14):
 Product
 10
 (0.835
 g,
 0.911
 mmol)
 
was
 stirred
 in
 TFA/DCM
 (1:1,
 20
 ml)
 for
 1
 hr.
 
 Most
 of
 the
 solvent
 was
 removed
 under
 reduced
 
pressure
 and
 the
 remaining
 solution
 was
 pipetted
 into
 cold
 t-­‐butylmethylether/hexanes
 (2:1)
 in
 
order
 to
 precipitate
 out
 the
 crude
 product.
 
 The
 solvent
 was
 pipetted
 off
 and
 the
 product
 blown
 
dry
 with
 argon.
 
 The
 crude
 product
 was
 purified
 with
 column
 chromatography
 (5%
 MeOH/DCM)
 
and
 further
 purified
 by
 reverse-­‐phase
 HPLC
 (ACN/H20)
 to
 give
 11
 (914
 mg,
 >99.9%
 yield)
 as
 a
 
yellowish
 solid.
 ESI-­‐MS
 m/z:
 675.3
 [M+]
 

 
Cleavage
 from
 resin
 to
 linear
 Z-­‐Phe(3-­‐F,
 4-­‐NO2)-­‐Asn(Trt)-­‐Tyr-­‐Ala-­‐H
 (16):
 
 Yellow
 solid
 (0.964
 g
 
56.2%
 yield)
 
 

 
Deprotection
 of
 Asn(Trt)
 to
 -­‐Z-­‐Phe(3-­‐F,
 4-­‐NO2)-­‐Asn-­‐Tyr-­‐Ala-­‐H
 (17):
 Yellow
 solid
 (453mg
 63.3%
 
yield).
 ESI-­‐MS
 m/z:
 695.3
 [M+]
 

 
31
 

 

Cleavage
 from
 resin
 to
 Z-­‐Phe(4-­‐NO2)-­‐Leu-­‐Tyr-­‐Leu-­‐H
 (15):
 Yellow
 Solid
 (1.06
 g
 33.3%).
 ESI-­‐MS
 
m/z:
 716.3
 [M+]
 

 
Cleavage
 from
 resin
 to
 linear
 Z-­‐Phe(3-­‐F,
 4-­‐NO2)-­‐
 Leu-­‐Tyr-­‐Leu-­‐H
 (18):
 Yellow
 Solid
 (0.871
 g
 
21.9%).
 ESI-­‐MS
 m/z:
 695.3
 [M+]
 

 
Kinetic
 Assays
 
20S
 proteasome
 CT-­‐L
 activity:
 Wells
 contained
 2
 μL
 of
 inhibitor
 varying
 concentrations
 in
 DMSO,
 
87
 μL
 of
 buffer
 (20
 mM
 HEPES,
 0.5
 mM
 EDTA,
 and
 0.037%
 SDS,
 pH
 7.8),
 and
 2
 μL
 of
 0.5
 mM
 Suc-­‐
Leu-­‐Leu-­‐Val-­‐Tyr-­‐AMC
 substrate
 in
 DMSO.
 Lastly,
 10
 μL
 of
 0.2
 μM
 20S
 rabbit
 proteasome
 in
 H2O
 
was
 added
 to
 the
 wells
 and
 fluorometric
 measurements
 were
 recorded
 every
 20s
 from
 3-­‐10
 
min.
 

 
Chymotrypsin:
 Wells
 contained
 2
 μL
 of
 inhibitor
 varying
 concentrations
 in
 DMSO,
 192
 μL
 of
 
buffer
 (0.05
 M
 NaH2PO4/
 Na2HPO4,
 pH
 7.8),
 and
 2
 μL
 of
 0.25
 μM
 Suc-­‐Leu-­‐Leu-­‐Val-­‐Tyr-­‐AMC
 
substrate
 in
 DMSO.
 Lastly,
 4
 μL
 of
 5
 μM
 chymotrypsin
 in
 H2O
 was
 added
 to
 the
 wells
 and
 
fluorometric
 measurements
 were
 recorded
 every
 20s
 from
 3-­‐10
 min.
 

 
Calpain:
 Wells
 contained
 2
 μL
 of
 inhibitor
 varying
 concentrations
 in
 DMSO
 and
 150
 μL
 a
 
buffer/substrate
 solution
 (50
 mM
 Hepes
 at
 pH
 7.5,
 11
 mM
 CaCl2,
 11
 mM
 cysteine,
 2.0
 mM
 Suc-­‐
Leu-­‐Tyr-­‐AMC
 substrate).
 
 Lastly,
 4
 μL
 of
 dilute
 calpain
 in
 buffer
 was
 added
 to
 the
 wells
 and
 
fluorometric
 measurements
 were
 recorded
 every
 20s
 from
 0-­‐2
 min.
 

 

32
 

 

Cruzain:
 Wells
 contained
 2
 μL
 of
 inhibitor
 varying
 concentrations
 in
 DMSO,
 250
 μL
 of
 activated
 
buffer
 (100
 mM
 sodium
 acetate,
 0.001%
 triton-­‐X
 at
 pH
 7.8,
 5
 mM
 DTT),
 and
 4
 μL
 of
 2
 mM
 Z-­‐Phe-­‐
Arg-­‐AMC
 substrate
 in
 DMSO.
 Lastly,
 5
 μL
 of
 dilute
 cruzain
 in
 buffer
 was
 added
 to
 the
 wells
 and
 
fluorometric
 measurements
 were
 recorded
 every
 20s
 from
 3-­‐10
 min.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
33
 

 

Acknowledgements:
 

 

 

This
 thesis
 has
 been
 a
 journey,
 to
 say
 the
 least.
 
 My
 initial
 reaction
 is
 to
 reflect
 upon
 it
 

and
 lament
 the
 large
 piece
 of
 my
 soul
 that
 it
 has
 gouged
 out.
 
 It
 would
 be
 cathartic
 to
 label
 it
 as
 
a
 simple
 stack
 of
 dead
 organic
 material,
 inscribed
 with
 thousands
 of
 words
 of
 scientific
 minutia;
 
a
 parasitic
 document
 that
 has
 been
 manufactured
 on
 a
 foundation
 of
 insomnia
 and
 strained
 
relationships.
 
 But
 I
 know
 it
 means
 more
 than
 that,
 at
 least
 in
 some
 capacity.
 
 It
 shows
 a
 
commitment
 to
 an
 idea,
 fleshed
 out
 through
 hours
 upon
 hours
 of
 work.
 
 Though
 imperfect,
 It
 is
 
something
 real,
 something
 tangible,
 something
 weighty
 that
 I
 can
 take
 away
 from
 my
 collegiate
 
experience.
 
 It
 is,
 if
 nothing
 else,
 a
 declaration
 of
 my
 devotion
 to
 academia
 and
 my
 willingness
 to
 
push
 the
 limits
 of
 my
 patience,
 my
 understanding,
 and
 my
 work
 ethic.
 
 It
 is
 something
 that
 I
 
have
 put
 a
 part
 of
 myself
 into
 and
 even
 if
 by
 that
 virtue
 alone,
 I
 can
 look
 upon
 it
 with
 a
 sense
 of
 
pride.
 

 


 
 
 
 I
 would
 like
 to
 take
 this
 opportunity
 to
 thank
 the
 people
 that
 made
 this
 thesis
 and
 my
 

academic
 career
 possible.
 
 I
 would
 firstly
 like
 to
 thank
 my
 parents
 for
 their
 loving
 support
 and
 
their
 financial
 support.
 
 I
 would
 like
 to
 thank
 my
 girlfriend
 Faith
 and
 my
 friends
 for
 supporting
 
me
 through
 the
 rough
 times
 and
 for
 making
 this
 experience
 one
 of
 the
 best
 in
 my
 life.
 
 I
 would
 
like
 to
 thank
 my
 professors,
 especially
 Frank
 Dunnivant,
 Nate
 Boland,
 and
 Eric
 Abbey
 for
 
instilling
 a
 fervent
 sense
 of
 curiosity
 in
 Chemistry.
 
 Most
 importantly,
 I
 would
 like
 to
 thank
 my
 
research
 advisor
 and
 friend,
 Marion
 Götz,
 for
 driving
 me
 to
 be
 the
 best
 chemist
 that
 I
 can
 be.
 
 
And
 lastly,
 I’d
 like
 to
 thank
 my
 cats
 Jonesy
 and
 Winston
 
 =^
 .
 ^=
 

 

 
To
 whom
 it
 may
 concern:
 it
 is
 springtime.
 
 It
 is
 late
 afternoon.
 
-­‐Kurt
 Vonnegut
 
34
 

 


 

References
 

 
1.
 
2.
 
3.
 
4.
 
5.
 
6.
 
7.
 
8.
 
9.
 

10.
 
11.
 
12.
 
13.
 
14.
 

15.
 
16.
 
17.
 
18.
 

19.
 

Alan
 J.
 Barrett,
 N.
 D.
 R.,
 J.
 Fred
 Woessner,
 Handbook
 of
 Proteolytic
 Enzymes,
 Third
 Edition.
 
2013.
 
Berger,
 A.;
 Schechter,
 I.,
 Mapping
 the
 active
 site
 of
 papain
 with
 the
 aid
 of
 peptide
 
substrates
 and
 inhibitors.
 Philos
 Trans
 R
 Soc
 Lond
 B
 Biol
 Sci
 1970,
 257
 (813),
 249-­‐64.
 
Tomlin,
 F.,
 Synthesis,
 characterization,
 and
 potency
 of
 novel
 bimodal
 proteasome
 
inhibitors.
 Whitman
 College
 2013.
 
King,
 R.
 W.;
 Deshaies,
 R.
 J.;
 Peters,
 J.
 M.;
 Kirschner,
 M.
 W.,
 How
 proteolysis
 drives
 the
 cell
 
cycle.
 Science
 1996,
 274
 (5293),
 1652-­‐9.
 
Pagano,
 M.,
 Cell
 cycle
 regulation
 by
 the
 ubiquitin
 pathway.
 FASEB
 J
 1997,
 11
 (13),
 1067-­‐75.
 
Hershko,
 A.;
 Ciechanover,
 A.,
 The
 ubiquitin
 system.
 Annu
 Rev
 Biochem
 1998,
 67,
 425-­‐79.
 
Kisselev,
 A.
 F.;
 Goldberg,
 A.
 L.,
 Proteasome
 inhibitors:
 from
 research
 tools
 to
 drug
 
candidates.
 Chem
 Biol
 2001,
 8
 (8),
 739-­‐58.
 
Voges,
 D.;
 Zwickl,
 P.;
 Baumeister,
 W.,
 The
 26S
 proteasome:
 a
 molecular
 machine
 designed
 
for
 controlled
 proteolysis.
 Annu
 Rev
 Biochem
 1999,
 68,
 1015-­‐68.
 
Matthews,
 W.;
 Driscoll,
 J.;
 Tanaka,
 K.;
 Ichihara,
 A.;
 Goldberg,
 A.
 L.,
 Involvement
 of
 the
 
proteasome
 in
 various
 degradative
 processes
 in
 mammalian
 cells.
 Proc
 Natl
 Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 
1989,
 86
 (8),
 2597-­‐601.
 
Orlowski,
 M.,
 The
 multicatalytic
 proteinase
 complex,
 a
 major
 extralysosomal
 proteolytic
 
system.
 Biochemistry
 1990,
 29
 (45),
 10289-­‐97.
 
Groll,
 M.;
 Bochtler,
 M.;
 Brandstetter,
 H.;
 Clausen,
 T.;
 Huber,
 R.,
 Molecular
 machines
 for
 
protein
 degradation.
 Chembiochem
 2005,
 6
 (2),
 222-­‐56.
 
Wojcik,
 C.,
 Proteasomes
 in
 apoptosis:
 villains
 or
 guardians?
 Cell
 Mol
 Life
 Sci
 1999,
 56
 (11-­‐
12),
 908-­‐17.
 
Fuchs,
 S.
 Y.,
 The
 role
 of
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 pathway
 in
 oncogenic
 signaling.
 Cancer
 Biol
 
Ther
 2002,
 1
 (4),
 337-­‐41.
 
Muchamuel,
 T.;
 Basler,
 M.;
 Aujay,
 M.
 A.;
 Suzuki,
 E.;
 Kalim,
 K.
 W.;
 Lauer,
 C.;
 Sylvain,
 C.;
 Ring,
 
E.
 R.;
 Shields,
 J.;
 Jiang,
 J.;
 Shwonek,
 P.;
 Parlati,
 F.;
 Demo,
 S.
 D.;
 Bennett,
 M.
 K.;
 Kirk,
 C.
 J.;
 
Groettrup,
 M.,
 A
 selective
 inhibitor
 of
 the
 immunoproteasome
 subunit
 LMP7
 blocks
 
cytokine
 production
 and
 attenuates
 progression
 of
 experimental
 arthritis.
 Nat
 Med
 2009,
 
15
 (7),
 781-­‐7.
 
Orlowski,
 R.
 Z.,
 The
 role
 of
 the
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 pathway
 in
 apoptosis.
 Cell
 Death
 
Differ
 1999,
 6
 (4),
 303-­‐13.
 
Kisselev,
 A.
 F.;
 van
 der
 Linden,
 W.
 A.;
 Overkleeft,
 H.
 S.,
 Proteasome
 inhibitors:
 an
 expanding
 
army
 attacking
 a
 unique
 target.
 Chem
 Biol
 2012,
 19
 (1),
 99-­‐115.
 
Groll,
 M.;
 Ditzel,
 L.;
 Lowe,
 J.;
 Stock,
 D.;
 Bochtler,
 M.;
 Bartunik,
 H.
 D.;
 Huber,
 R.,
 Structure
 of
 
20S
 proteasome
 from
 yeast
 at
 2.4
 A
 resolution.
 Nature
 1997,
 386
 (6624),
 463-­‐71.
 
Dick,
 T.
 P.;
 Nussbaum,
 A.
 K.;
 Deeg,
 M.;
 Heinemeyer,
 W.;
 Groll,
 M.;
 Schirle,
 M.;
 Keilholz,
 W.;
 
Stevanovic,
 S.;
 Wolf,
 D.
 H.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Rammensee,
 H.
 G.;
 Schild,
 H.,
 Contribution
 of
 
proteasomal
 beta-­‐subunits
 to
 the
 cleavage
 of
 peptide
 substrates
 analyzed
 with
 yeast
 
mutants.
 J
 Biol
 Chem
 1998,
 273
 (40),
 25637-­‐46.
 
Groll,
 M.;
 Heinemeyer,
 W.;
 Jager,
 S.;
 Ullrich,
 T.;
 Bochtler,
 M.;
 Wolf,
 D.
 H.;
 Huber,
 R.,
 The
 
catalytic
 sites
 of
 20S
 proteasomes
 and
 their
 role
 in
 subunit
 maturation:
 a
 mutational
 and
 
crystallographic
 study.
 Proc
 Natl
 Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 1999,
 96
 (20),
 10976-­‐83.
 
35
 


 

20.
  Unno,
 M.;
 Mizushima,
 T.;
 Morimoto,
 Y.;
 Tomisugi,
 Y.;
 Tanaka,
 K.;
 Yasuoka,
 N.;
 Tsukihara,
 T.,
 
The
 structure
 of
 the
 mammalian
 20S
 proteasome
 at
 2.75
 A
 resolution.
 Structure
 2002,
 10
 
(5),
 609-­‐18.
 
21.
  Wang,
 J.;
 Maldonado,
 M.
 A.,
 The
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 system
 and
 its
 role
 in
 inflammatory
 
and
 autoimmune
 diseases.
 Cell
 Mol
 Immunol
 2006,
 3
 (4),
 255-­‐61.
 
22.
  Chen,
 J.
 J.;
 Lin,
 F.;
 Qin,
 Z.
 H.,
 The
 roles
 of
 the
 proteasome
 pathway
 in
 signal
 transduction
 
and
 neurodegenerative
 diseases.
 Neurosci
 Bull
 2008,
 24
 (3),
 183-­‐94.
 
23.
  Burger,
 A.
 M.;
 Seth,
 A.
 K.,
 The
 ubiquitin-­‐mediated
 protein
 degradation
 pathway
 in
 cancer:
 
therapeutic
 implications.
 Eur
 J
 Cancer
 2004,
 40
 (15),
 2217-­‐29.
 
24.
  Kane,
 R.
 C.;
 Farrell,
 A.
 T.;
 Sridhara,
 R.;
 Pazdur,
 R.,
 United
 States
 Food
 and
 Drug
 
Administration
 approval
 summary:
 bortezomib
 for
 the
 treatment
 of
 progressive
 multiple
 
myeloma
 after
 one
 prior
 therapy.
 Clin
 Cancer
 Res
 2006,
 12
 (10),
 2955-­‐60.
 
25.
  Kane,
 R.
 C.;
 Dagher,
 R.;
 Farrell,
 A.;
 Ko,
 C.
 W.;
 Sridhara,
 R.;
 Justice,
 R.;
 Pazdur,
 R.,
 Bortezomib
 
for
 the
 treatment
 of
 mantle
 cell
 lymphoma.
 Clin
 Cancer
 Res
 2007,
 13
 (18
 Pt
 1),
 5291-­‐4.
 
26.
  Bross,
 P.
 F.;
 Kane,
 R.;
 Farrell,
 A.
 T.;
 Abraham,
 S.;
 Benson,
 K.;
 Brower,
 M.
 E.;
 Bradley,
 S.;
 
Gobburu,
 J.
 V.;
 Goheer,
 A.;
 Lee,
 S.
 L.;
 Leighton,
 J.;
 Liang,
 C.
 Y.;
 Lostritto,
 R.
 T.;
 McGuinn,
 W.
 
D.;
 Morse,
 D.
 E.;
 Rahman,
 A.;
 Rosario,
 L.
 A.;
 Verbois,
 S.
 L.;
 Williams,
 G.;
 Wang,
 Y.
 C.;
 Pazdur,
 
R.,
 Approval
 summary
 for
 bortezomib
 for
 injection
 in
 the
 treatment
 of
 multiple
 myeloma.
 
Clin
 Cancer
 Res
 2004,
 10
 (12
 Pt
 1),
 3954-­‐64.
 
27.
  Rolfe,
 M.;
 Chiu,
 M.
 I.;
 Pagano,
 M.,
 The
 ubiquitin-­‐mediated
 proteolytic
 pathway
 as
 a
 
therapeutic
 area.
 J
 Mol
 Med
 (Berl)
 1997,
 75
 (1),
 5-­‐17.
 
28.
  Meriin,
 A.
 B.;
 Gabai,
 V.
 L.;
 Yaglom,
 J.;
 Shifrin,
 V.
 I.;
 Sherman,
 M.
 Y.,
 Proteasome
 inhibitors
 
activate
 stress
 kinases
 and
 induce
 Hsp72.
 Diverse
 effects
 on
 apoptosis.
 J
 Biol
 Chem
 1998,
 
273
 (11),
 6373-­‐9.
 
29.
  Lopes,
 U.
 G.;
 Erhardt,
 P.;
 Yao,
 R.;
 Cooper,
 G.
 M.,
 p53-­‐dependent
 induction
 of
 apoptosis
 by
 
proteasome
 inhibitors.
 J
 Biol
 Chem
 1997,
 272
 (20),
 12893-­‐6.
 
30.
  Maki,
 C.
 G.;
 Huibregtse,
 J.
 M.;
 Howley,
 P.
 M.,
 In
 vivo
 ubiquitination
 and
 proteasome-­‐
mediated
 degradation
 of
 p53(1).
 Cancer
 Res
 1996,
 56
 (11),
 2649-­‐54.
 
31.
  Pagano,
 M.;
 Tam,
 S.
 W.;
 Theodoras,
 A.
 M.;
 Beer-­‐Romero,
 P.;
 Del
 Sal,
 G.;
 Chau,
 V.;
 Yew,
 P.
 R.;
 
Draetta,
 G.
 F.;
 Rolfe,
 M.,
 Role
 of
 the
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 pathway
 in
 regulating
 
abundance
 of
 the
 cyclin-­‐dependent
 kinase
 inhibitor
 p27.
 Science
 1995,
 269
 (5224),
 682-­‐5.
 
32.
  Li,
 B.;
 Dou,
 Q.
 P.,
 Bax
 degradation
 by
 the
 ubiquitin/proteasome-­‐dependent
 pathway:
 
involvement
 in
 tumor
 survival
 and
 progression.
 Proc
 Natl
 Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 2000,
 97
 (8),
 3850-­‐
5.
 
33.
  Palombella,
 V.
 J.;
 Rando,
 O.
 J.;
 Goldberg,
 A.
 L.;
 Maniatis,
 T.,
 The
 ubiquitin-­‐proteasome
 
pathway
 is
 required
 for
 processing
 the
 NF-­‐kappa
 B1
 precursor
 protein
 and
 the
 activation
 of
 
NF-­‐kappa
 B.
 Cell
 1994,
 78
 (5),
 773-­‐85.
 
34.
  Kumatori,
 A.;
 Tanaka,
 K.;
 Inamura,
 N.;
 Sone,
 S.;
 Ogura,
 T.;
 Matsumoto,
 T.;
 Tachikawa,
 T.;
 
Shin,
 S.;
 Ichihara,
 A.,
 Abnormally
 high
 expression
 of
 proteasomes
 in
 human
 leukemic
 cells.
 
Proc
 Natl
 Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 1990,
 87
 (18),
 7071-­‐5.
 
35.
  Arlt,
 A.;
 Bauer,
 I.;
 Schafmayer,
 C.;
 Tepel,
 J.;
 Muerkoster,
 S.
 S.;
 Brosch,
 M.;
 Roder,
 C.;
 
Kalthoff,
 H.;
 Hampe,
 J.;
 Moyer,
 M.
 P.;
 Folsch,
 U.
 R.;
 Schafer,
 H.,
 Increased
 proteasome
 
subunit
 protein
 expression
 and
 proteasome
 activity
 in
 colon
 cancer
 relate
 to
 an
 enhanced
 
activation
 of
 nuclear
 factor
 E2-­‐related
 factor
 2
 (Nrf2).
 Oncogene
 2009,
 28
 (45),
 3983-­‐96.
 
36.
  Delic,
 J.;
 Masdehors,
 P.;
 Omura,
 S.;
 Cosset,
 J.
 M.;
 Dumont,
 J.;
 Binet,
 J.
 L.;
 Magdelenat,
 H.,
 
The
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 lactacystin
 induces
 apoptosis
 and
 sensitizes
 chemo-­‐
 and
 
radioresistant
 human
 chronic
 lymphocytic
 leukaemia
 lymphocytes
 to
 TNF-­‐alpha-­‐initiated
 
apoptosis.
 Br
 J
 Cancer
 1998,
 77
 (7),
 1103-­‐7.
 
36
 

 

37.
  Orlowski,
 R.
 Z.;
 Eswara,
 J.
 R.;
 Lafond-­‐Walker,
 A.;
 Grever,
 M.
 R.;
 Orlowski,
 M.;
 Dang,
 C.
 V.,
 
Tumor
 growth
 inhibition
 induced
 in
 a
 murine
 model
 of
 human
 Burkitt's
 lymphoma
 by
 a
 
proteasome
 inhibitor.
 Cancer
 Res
 1998,
 58
 (19),
 4342-­‐8.
 
38.
  Adams,
 J.,
 The
 proteasome:
 a
 suitable
 antineoplastic
 target.
 Nat
 Rev
 Cancer
 2004,
 4
 (5),
 
349-­‐60.
 
39.
  Adams,
 J.,
 The
 development
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 as
 anticancer
 drugs.
 Cancer
 Cell
 
2004,
 5
 (5),
 417-­‐21.
 
40.
  Chen,
 P.;
 Hochstrasser,
 M.,
 Autocatalytic
 subunit
 processing
 couples
 active
 site
 formation
 
in
 the
 20S
 proteasome
 to
 completion
 of
 assembly.
 Cell
 1996,
 86
 (6),
 961-­‐72.
 
41.
  Heinemeyer,
 W.;
 Fischer,
 M.;
 Krimmer,
 T.;
 Stachon,
 U.;
 Wolf,
 D.
 H.,
 The
 active
 sites
 of
 the
 
eukaryotic
 20
 S
 proteasome
 and
 their
 involvement
 in
 subunit
 precursor
 processing.
 J
 Biol
 
Chem
 1997,
 272
 (40),
 25200-­‐9.
 
42.
  Arendt,
 C.
 S.;
 Hochstrasser,
 M.,
 Identification
 of
 the
 yeast
 20S
 proteasome
 catalytic
 centers
 
and
 subunit
 interactions
 required
 for
 active-­‐site
 formation.
 Proc
 Natl
 Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 1997,
 
94
 (14),
 7156-­‐61.
 
43.
  Arastu-­‐Kapur,
 S.;
 Anderl,
 J.
 L.;
 Kraus,
 M.;
 Parlati,
 F.;
 Shenk,
 K.
 D.;
 Lee,
 S.
 J.;
 Muchamuel,
 T.;
 
Bennett,
 M.
 K.;
 Driessen,
 C.;
 Ball,
 A.
 J.;
 Kirk,
 C.
 J.,
 Nonproteasomal
 targets
 of
 the
 
proteasome
 inhibitors
 bortezomib
 and
 carfilzomib:
 a
 link
 to
 clinical
 adverse
 events.
 Clin
 
Cancer
 Res
 2011,
 17
 (9),
 2734-­‐43.
 
44.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Moroder,
 L.,
 The
 persisting
 challenge
 of
 selective
 and
 specific
 
proteasome
 inhibition.
 J
 Pept
 Sci
 2009,
 15
 (2),
 58-­‐66.
 
45.
  Argyriou,
 A.
 A.;
 Bruna,
 J.;
 Marmiroli,
 P.;
 Cavaletti,
 G.,
 Chemotherapy-­‐induced
 peripheral
 
neurotoxicity
 (CIPN):
 an
 update.
 Crit
 Rev
 Oncol
 Hematol
 2012,
 82
 (1),
 51-­‐77.
 
46.
  Argyriou,
 A.
 A.;
 Iconomou,
 G.;
 Kalofonos,
 H.
 P.,
 Bortezomib-­‐induced
 peripheral
 neuropathy
 
in
 multiple
 myeloma:
 a
 comprehensive
 review
 of
 the
 literature.
 Blood
 2008,
 112
 (5),
 1593-­‐
9.
 
47.
  Goldberg,
 A.
 L.,
 Bortezomib's
 Scientific
 Origins
 and
 Its
 Tortuous
 Path
 to
 the
 Clinic.
 
Milestones
 in
 Drug
 Therapy
 2011,
 1-­‐27.
 
48.
  Everly,
 M.
 J.,
 A
 summary
 of
 bortezomib
 use
 in
 transplantation
 across
 29
 centers.
 Clin
 
Transpl
 2009,
 323-­‐37.
 
49.
  Trivedi,
 H.
 L.;
 Terasaki,
 P.
 I.;
 Feroz,
 A.;
 Everly,
 M.
 J.;
 Vanikar,
 A.
 V.;
 Shankar,
 V.;
 Trivedi,
 V.
 B.;
 
Kaneku,
 H.;
 Idica,
 A.
 K.;
 Modi,
 P.
 R.;
 Khemchandani,
 S.
 I.;
 Dave,
 S.
 D.,
 Abrogation
 of
 anti-­‐HLA
 
antibodies
 via
 proteasome
 inhibition.
 Transplantation
 2009,
 87
 (10),
 1555-­‐61.
 
50.
  Ichikawa,
 H.
 T.;
 Conley,
 T.;
 Muchamuel,
 T.;
 Jiang,
 J.;
 Lee,
 S.;
 Owen,
 T.;
 Barnard,
 J.;
 Nevarez,
 
S.;
 Goldman,
 B.
 I.;
 Kirk,
 C.
 J.;
 Looney,
 R.
 J.;
 Anolik,
 J.
 H.,
 Beneficial
 effect
 of
 novel
 
proteasome
 inhibitors
 in
 murine
 lupus
 via
 dual
 inhibition
 of
 type
 I
 interferon
 and
 
autoantibody-­‐secreting
 cells.
 Arthritis
 Rheum
 2012,
 64
 (2),
 493-­‐503.
 
51.
  Pahl,
 H.
 L.,
 Activators
 and
 target
 genes
 of
 Rel/NF-­‐kappaB
 transcription
 factors.
 Oncogene
 
1999,
 18
 (49),
 6853-­‐66.
 
52.
  Williams,
 A.
 J.;
 Dave,
 J.
 R.;
 Tortella,
 F.
 C.,
 Neuroprotection
 with
 the
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 
MLN519
 in
 focal
 ischemic
 brain
 injury:
 relation
 to
 nuclear
 factor
 kappaB
 (NF-­‐kappaB),
 
inflammatory
 gene
 expression,
 and
 leukocyte
 infiltration.
 Neurochem
 Int
 2006,
 49
 (2),
 106-­‐
12.
 
53.
  Hines,
 J.;
 Groll,
 M.;
 Fahnestock,
 M.;
 Crews,
 C.
 M.,
 Proteasome
 inhibition
 by
 fellutamide
 B
 
induces
 nerve
 growth
 factor
 synthesis.
 Chem
 Biol
 2008,
 15
 (5),
 501-­‐12.
 
54.
  Lindsten,
 K.;
 Menendez-­‐Benito,
 V.;
 Masucci,
 M.
 G.;
 Dantuma,
 N.
 P.,
 A
 transgenic
 mouse
 
model
 of
 the
 ubiquitin/proteasome
 system.
 Nat
 Biotechnol
 2003,
 21
 (8),
 897-­‐902.
 
37
 

 

55.
  Adams,
 J.;
 Behnke,
 M.;
 Chen,
 S.;
 Cruickshank,
 A.
 A.;
 Dick,
 L.
 R.;
 Grenier,
 L.;
 Klunder,
 J.
 M.;
 
Ma,
 Y.
 T.;
 Plamondon,
 L.;
 Stein,
 R.
 L.,
 Potent
 and
 selective
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 proteasome:
 
dipeptidyl
 boronic
 acids.
 Bioorg
 Med
 Chem
 Lett
 1998,
 8
 (4),
 333-­‐8.
 
56.
  Momose,
 I.;
 Sekizawa,
 R.;
 Hirosawa,
 S.;
 Ikeda,
 D.;
 Naganawa,
 H.;
 Iinuma,
 H.;
 Takeuchi,
 T.,
 
Tyropeptins
 A
 and
 B,
 new
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 produced
 by
 Kitasatospora
 sp.
 MK993-­‐
dF2.
 II.
 Structure
 determination
 and
 synthesis.
 J
 Antibiot
 (Tokyo)
 2001,
 54
 (12),
 1004-­‐12.
 
57.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Berkers,
 C.
 R.;
 Ploegh,
 H.
 L.;
 Ovaa,
 H.,
 Crystal
 structure
 of
 the
 boronic
 acid-­‐based
 
proteasome
 inhibitor
 bortezomib
 in
 complex
 with
 the
 yeast
 20S
 proteasome.
 Structure
 
2006,
 14
 (3),
 451-­‐6.
 
58.
  Adams,
 J.;
 Palombella,
 V.
 J.;
 Sausville,
 E.
 A.;
 Johnson,
 J.;
 Destree,
 A.;
 Lazarus,
 D.
 D.;
 Maas,
 J.;
 
Pien,
 C.
 S.;
 Prakash,
 S.;
 Elliott,
 P.
 J.,
 Proteasome
 inhibitors:
 a
 novel
 class
 of
 potent
 and
 
effective
 antitumor
 agents.
 Cancer
 Res
 1999,
 59
 (11),
 2615-­‐22.
 
59.
  LeBlanc,
 R.;
 Catley,
 L.
 P.;
 Hideshima,
 T.;
 Lentzsch,
 S.;
 Mitsiades,
 C.
 S.;
 Mitsiades,
 N.;
 
Neuberg,
 D.;
 Goloubeva,
 O.;
 Pien,
 C.
 S.;
 Adams,
 J.;
 Gupta,
 D.;
 Richardson,
 P.
 G.;
 Munshi,
 N.
 
C.;
 Anderson,
 K.
 C.,
 Proteasome
 inhibitor
 PS-­‐341
 inhibits
 human
 myeloma
 cell
 growth
 in
 
vivo
 and
 prolongs
 survival
 in
 a
 murine
 model.
 Cancer
 Res
 2002,
 62
 (17),
 4996-­‐5000.
 
60.
  Teicher,
 B.
 A.;
 Ara,
 G.;
 Herbst,
 R.;
 Palombella,
 V.
 J.;
 Adams,
 J.,
 The
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 PS-­‐
341
 in
 cancer
 therapy.
 Clin
 Cancer
 Res
 1999,
 5
 (9),
 2638-­‐45.
 
61.
  Aghajanian,
 C.;
 Soignet,
 S.;
 Dizon,
 D.
 S.;
 Pien,
 C.
 S.;
 Adams,
 J.;
 Elliott,
 P.
 J.;
 Sabbatini,
 P.;
 
Miller,
 V.;
 Hensley,
 M.
 L.;
 Pezzulli,
 S.;
 Canales,
 C.;
 Daud,
 A.;
 Spriggs,
 D.
 R.,
 A
 phase
 I
 trial
 of
 
the
 novel
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 PS341
 in
 advanced
 solid
 tumor
 malignancies.
 Clin
 Cancer
 
Res
 2002,
 8
 (8),
 2505-­‐11.
 
62.
  Orlowski,
 R.
 Z.;
 Stinchcombe,
 T.
 E.;
 Mitchell,
 B.
 S.;
 Shea,
 T.
 C.;
 Baldwin,
 A.
 S.;
 Stahl,
 S.;
 
Adams,
 J.;
 Esseltine,
 D.
 L.;
 Elliott,
 P.
 J.;
 Pien,
 C.
 S.;
 Guerciolini,
 R.;
 Anderson,
 J.
 K.;
 Depcik-­‐
Smith,
 N.
 D.;
 Bhagat,
 R.;
 Lehman,
 M.
 J.;
 Novick,
 S.
 C.;
 O'Connor,
 O.
 A.;
 Soignet,
 S.
 L.,
 Phase
 I
 
trial
 of
 the
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 PS-­‐341
 in
 patients
 with
 refractory
 hematologic
 
malignancies.
 J
 Clin
 Oncol
 2002,
 20
 (22),
 4420-­‐7.
 
63.
  Richardson,
 P.
 G.;
 Barlogie,
 B.;
 Berenson,
 J.;
 Singhal,
 S.;
 Jagannath,
 S.;
 Irwin,
 D.;
 Rajkumar,
 
S.
 V.;
 Srkalovic,
 G.;
 Alsina,
 M.;
 Alexanian,
 R.;
 Siegel,
 D.;
 Orlowski,
 R.
 Z.;
 Kuter,
 D.;
 Limentani,
 
S.
 A.;
 Lee,
 S.;
 Hideshima,
 T.;
 Esseltine,
 D.
 L.;
 Kauffman,
 M.;
 Adams,
 J.;
 Schenkein,
 D.
 P.;
 
Anderson,
 K.
 C.,
 A
 phase
 2
 study
 of
 bortezomib
 in
 relapsed,
 refractory
 myeloma.
 N
 Engl
 J
 
Med
 2003,
 348
 (26),
 2609-­‐17.
 
64.
  Kupperman,
 E.;
 Lee,
 E.
 C.;
 Cao,
 Y.;
 Bannerman,
 B.;
 Fitzgerald,
 M.;
 Berger,
 A.;
 Yu,
 J.;
 Yang,
 Y.;
 
Hales,
 P.;
 Bruzzese,
 F.;
 Liu,
 J.;
 Blank,
 J.;
 Garcia,
 K.;
 Tsu,
 C.;
 Dick,
 L.;
 Fleming,
 P.;
 Yu,
 L.;
 
Manfredi,
 M.;
 Rolfe,
 M.;
 Bolen,
 J.,
 Evaluation
 of
 the
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 MLN9708
 in
 
preclinical
 models
 of
 human
 cancer.
 Cancer
 Res
 2010,
 70
 (5),
 1970-­‐80.
 
65.
  Piva,
 R.;
 Ruggeri,
 B.;
 Williams,
 M.;
 Costa,
 G.;
 Tamagno,
 I.;
 Ferrero,
 D.;
 Giai,
 V.;
 Coscia,
 M.;
 
Peola,
 S.;
 Massaia,
 M.;
 Pezzoni,
 G.;
 Allievi,
 C.;
 Pescalli,
 N.;
 Cassin,
 M.;
 di
 Giovine,
 S.;
 Nicoli,
 
P.;
 de
 Feudis,
 P.;
 Strepponi,
 I.;
 Roato,
 I.;
 Ferracini,
 R.;
 Bussolati,
 B.;
 Camussi,
 G.;
 Jones-­‐Bolin,
 
S.;
 Hunter,
 K.;
 Zhao,
 H.;
 Neri,
 A.;
 Palumbo,
 A.;
 Berkers,
 C.;
 Ovaa,
 H.;
 Bernareggi,
 A.;
 
Inghirami,
 G.,
 CEP-­‐18770:
 A
 novel,
 orally
 active
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 with
 a
 tumor-­‐selective
 
pharmacologic
 profile
 competitive
 with
 bortezomib.
 Blood
 2008,
 111
 (5),
 2765-­‐75.
 
66.
  Chauhan,
 D.;
 Tian,
 Z.;
 Zhou,
 B.;
 Kuhn,
 D.;
 Orlowski,
 R.;
 Raje,
 N.;
 Richardson,
 P.;
 Anderson,
 K.
 
C.,
 In
 vitro
 and
 in
 vivo
 selective
 antitumor
 activity
 of
 a
 novel
 orally
 bioavailable
 proteasome
 
inhibitor
 MLN9708
 against
 multiple
 myeloma
 cells.
 Clin
 Cancer
 Res
 2011,
 17
 (16),
 5311-­‐21.
 
67.
  Meng,
 L.;
 Mohan,
 R.;
 Kwok,
 B.
 H.;
 Elofsson,
 M.;
 Sin,
 N.;
 Crews,
 C.
 M.,
 Epoxomicin,
 a
 potent
 
and
 selective
 proteasome
 inhibitor,
 exhibits
 in
 vivo
 antiinflammatory
 activity.
 Proc
 Natl
 
Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 1999,
 96
 (18),
 10403-­‐8.
 
38
 

 

68.
  Meng,
 L.;
 Kwok,
 B.
 H.;
 Sin,
 N.;
 Crews,
 C.
 M.,
 Eponemycin
 exerts
 its
 antitumor
 effect
 through
 
the
 inhibition
 of
 proteasome
 function.
 Cancer
 Res
 1999,
 59
 (12),
 2798-­‐801.
 
69.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Kim,
 K.
 B.;
 Kairies,
 N.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Crews,
 C.
 M.,
 Crystal
 structure
 of
 epoxomicin
 :
 
20S
 proteasome
 reveals
 a
 molecular
 basis
 for
 selectivity
 of
 alpha
 ',beta
 '-­‐epoxyketone
 
proteasome
 inhibitors.
 Journal
 of
 the
 American
 Chemical
 Society
 2000,
 122
 (6),
 1237-­‐1238.
 
70.
  Berenson,
 J.
 R.;
 Hilger,
 J.
 D.;
 Yellin,
 O.;
 Dichmann,
 R.;
 Patel-­‐Donnelly,
 D.;
 Boccia,
 R.
 V.;
 
Bessudo,
 A.;
 Stampleman,
 L.;
 Gravenor,
 D.;
 Eshaghian,
 S.;
 Nassir,
 Y.;
 Swift,
 R.
 A.;
 Vescio,
 R.
 
A.,
 Replacement
 of
 bortezomib
 with
 carfilzomib
 for
 multiple
 myeloma
 patients
 progressing
 
from
 bortezomib
 combination
 therapy.
 Leukemia
 2014.
 
71.
  Thompson,
 J.
 L.,
 Carfilzomib:
 a
 second-­‐generation
 proteasome
 inhibitor
 for
 the
 treatment
 
of
 relapsed
 and
 refractory
 multiple
 myeloma.
 Ann
 Pharmacother
 2013,
 47
 (1),
 56-­‐62.
 
72.
  Dick,
 L.
 R.;
 Cruikshank,
 A.
 A.;
 Destree,
 A.
 T.;
 Grenier,
 L.;
 McCormack,
 T.
 A.;
 Melandri,
 F.
 D.;
 
Nunes,
 S.
 L.;
 Palombella,
 V.
 J.;
 Parent,
 L.
 A.;
 Plamondon,
 L.;
 Stein,
 R.
 L.,
 Mechanistic
 studies
 
on
 the
 inactivation
 of
 the
 proteasome
 by
 lactacystin
 in
 cultured
 cells.
 J
 Biol
 Chem
 1997,
 272
 
(1),
 182-­‐8.
 
73.
  Fenteany,
 G.;
 Standaert,
 R.
 F.;
 Lane,
 W.
 S.;
 Choi,
 S.;
 Corey,
 E.
 J.;
 Schreiber,
 S.
 L.,
 Inhibition
 of
 
proteasome
 activities
 and
 subunit-­‐specific
 amino-­‐terminal
 threonine
 modification
 by
 
lactacystin.
 Science
 1995,
 268
 (5211),
 726-­‐31.
 
74.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Potts,
 B.
 C.,
 Proteasome
 structure,
 function,
 and
 lessons
 learned
 from
 beta-­‐
lactone
 inhibitors.
 Curr
 Top
 Med
 Chem
 2011,
 11
 (23),
 2850-­‐78.
 
75.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Potts,
 B.
 C.,
 Crystal
 structures
 of
 Salinosporamide
 A
 (NPI-­‐0052)
 and
 B
 
(NPI-­‐0047)
 in
 complex
 with
 the
 20S
 proteasome
 reveal
 important
 consequences
 of
 beta-­‐
lactone
 ring
 opening
 and
 a
 mechanism
 for
 irreversible
 binding.
 J
 Am
 Chem
 Soc
 2006,
 128
 
(15),
 5136-­‐41.
 
76.
  Bogyo,
 M.;
 McMaster,
 J.
 S.;
 Gaczynska,
 M.;
 Tortorella,
 D.;
 Goldberg,
 A.
 L.;
 Ploegh,
 H.,
 
Covalent
 modification
 of
 the
 active
 site
 threonine
 of
 proteasomal
 beta
 subunits
 and
 the
 
Escherichia
 coli
 homolog
 HslV
 by
 a
 new
 class
 of
 inhibitors.
 Proc
 Natl
 Acad
 Sci
 U
 S
 A
 1997,
 94
 
(13),
 6629-­‐34.
 
77.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Nazif,
 T.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Bogyo,
 M.,
 Probing
 structural
 determinants
 distal
 to
 the
 site
 
of
 hydrolysis
 that
 control
 substrate
 specificity
 of
 the
 20S
 proteasome.
 Chem
 Biol
 2002,
 9
 
(5),
 655-­‐62.
 
78.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Schellenberg,
 B.;
 Bachmann,
 A.
 S.;
 Archer,
 C.
 R.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Powell,
 T.
 K.;
 Lindow,
 
S.;
 Kaiser,
 M.;
 Dudler,
 R.,
 A
 plant
 pathogen
 virulence
 factor
 inhibits
 the
 eukaryotic
 
proteasome
 by
 a
 novel
 mechanism.
 Nature
 2008,
 452
 (7188),
 755-­‐8.
 
79.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Koguchi,
 Y.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Kohno,
 J.,
 Crystal
 structure
 of
 the
 20
 S
 proteasome:TMC-­‐
95A
 complex:
 a
 non-­‐covalent
 proteasome
 inhibitor.
 J
 Mol
 Biol
 2001,
 311
 (3),
 543-­‐8.
 
80.
  Nickeleit,
 I.;
 Zender,
 S.;
 Sasse,
 F.;
 Geffers,
 R.;
 Brandes,
 G.;
 Sorensen,
 I.;
 Steinmetz,
 H.;
 
Kubicka,
 S.;
 Carlomagno,
 T.;
 Menche,
 D.;
 Gutgemann,
 I.;
 Buer,
 J.;
 Gossler,
 A.;
 Manns,
 M.
 P.;
 
Kalesse,
 M.;
 Frank,
 R.;
 Malek,
 N.
 P.,
 Argyrin
 a
 reveals
 a
 critical
 role
 for
 the
 tumor
 suppressor
 
protein
 p27(kip1)
 in
 mediating
 antitumor
 activities
 in
 response
 to
 proteasome
 inhibition.
 
Cancer
 Cell
 2008,
 14
 (1),
 23-­‐35.
 
81.
  Krunic,
 A.;
 Vallat,
 A.;
 Mo,
 S.;
 Lantvit,
 D.
 D.;
 Swanson,
 S.
 M.;
 Orjala,
 J.,
 Scytonemides
 A
 and
 B,
 
cyclic
 peptides
 with
 20S
 proteasome
 inhibitory
 activity
 from
 the
 cultured
 cyanobacterium
 
Scytonema
 hofmanii.
 J
 Nat
 Prod
 2010,
 73
 (11),
 1927-­‐32.
 
82.
  Mirabella,
 A.
 C.;
 Pletnev,
 A.
 A.;
 Downey,
 S.
 L.;
 Florea,
 B.
 I.;
 Shabaneh,
 T.
 B.;
 Britton,
 M.;
 
Verdoes,
 M.;
 Filippov,
 D.
 V.;
 Overkleeft,
 H.
 S.;
 Kisselev,
 A.
 F.,
 Specific
 cell-­‐permeable
 
inhibitor
 of
 proteasome
 trypsin-­‐like
 sites
 selectively
 sensitizes
 myeloma
 cells
 to
 bortezomib
 
and
 carfilzomib.
 Chem
 Biol
 2011,
 18
 (5),
 608-­‐18.
 
39
 

 

83.
  Britton,
 M.;
 Lucas,
 M.
 M.;
 Downey,
 S.
 L.;
 Screen,
 M.;
 Pletnev,
 A.
 A.;
 Verdoes,
 M.;
 Tokhunts,
 
R.
 A.;
 Amir,
 O.;
 Goddard,
 A.
 L.;
 Pelphrey,
 P.
 M.;
 Wright,
 D.
 L.;
 Overkleeft,
 H.
 S.;
 Kisselev,
 A.
 
F.,
 Selective
 inhibitor
 of
 proteasome's
 caspase-­‐like
 sites
 sensitizes
 cells
 to
 specific
 inhibition
 
of
 chymotrypsin-­‐like
 sites.
 Chem
 Biol
 2009,
 16
 (12),
 1278-­‐89.
 
84.
  Ho,
 Y.
 K.;
 Bargagna-­‐Mohan,
 P.;
 Wehenkel,
 M.;
 Mohan,
 R.;
 Kim,
 K.
 B.,
 LMP2-­‐specific
 
inhibitors:
 chemical
 genetic
 tools
 for
 proteasome
 biology.
 Chem
 Biol
 2007,
 14
 (4),
 419-­‐30.
 
85.
  Kuhn,
 D.
 J.;
 Hunsucker,
 S.
 A.;
 Chen,
 Q.;
 Voorhees,
 P.
 M.;
 Orlowski,
 M.;
 Orlowski,
 R.
 Z.,
 
Targeted
 inhibition
 of
 the
 immunoproteasome
 is
 a
 potent
 strategy
 against
 models
 of
 
multiple
 myeloma
 that
 overcomes
 resistance
 to
 conventional
 drugs
 and
 nonspecific
 
proteasome
 inhibitors.
 Blood
 2009,
 113
 (19),
 4667-­‐76.
 
86.
  Kaiser,
 M.;
 Groll,
 M.;
 Siciliano,
 C.;
 Assfalg-­‐Machleidt,
 I.;
 Weyher,
 E.;
 Kohno,
 J.;
 Milbradt,
 A.
 
G.;
 Renner,
 C.;
 Huber,
 R.;
 Moroder,
 L.,
 Binding
 mode
 of
 TMC-­‐95A
 analogues
 to
 eukaryotic
 
20S
 proteasome.
 Chembiochem
 2004,
 5
 (9),
 1256-­‐66.
 
87.
  Koguchi,
 Y.;
 Kohno,
 J.;
 Nishio,
 M.;
 Takahashi,
 K.;
 Okuda,
 T.;
 Ohnuki,
 T.;
 Komatsubara,
 S.,
 
TMC-­‐95A,
 B,
 C,
 and
 D,
 novel
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 produced
 by
 Apiospora
 montagnei
 Sacc.
 
TC
 1093.
 Taxonomy,
 production,
 isolation,
 and
 biological
 activities.
 J
 Antibiot
 (Tokyo)
 2000,
 
53
 (2),
 105-­‐9.
 
88.
  Lin,
 S.;
 Danishefsky,
 S.
 J.,
 The
 total
 synthesis
 of
 proteasome
 inhibitors
 TMC-­‐95A
 and
 TMC-­‐
95B:
 discovery
 of
 a
 new
 method
 to
 generate
 cis-­‐propenyl
 amides.
 Angew
 Chem
 Int
 Ed
 Engl
 
2002,
 41
 (3),
 512-­‐5.
 
89.
  Kaiser,
 M.;
 Milbradt,
 A.
 G.;
 Siciliano,
 C.;
 Assfalg-­‐Machleidt,
 I.;
 Machleidt,
 W.;
 Groll,
 M.;
 
Renner,
 C.;
 Moroder,
 L.,
 TMC-­‐95A
 analogues
 with
 endocyclic
 biphenyl
 ether
 group
 as
 
proteasome
 inhibitors.
 Chem
 Biodivers
 2004,
 1
 (1),
 161-­‐73.
 
90.
  Groll,
 M.;
 Gotz,
 M.;
 Kaiser,
 M.;
 Weyher,
 E.;
 Moroder,
 L.,
 TMC-­‐95-­‐based
 inhibitor
 design
 
provides
 evidence
 for
 the
 catalytic
 versatility
 of
 the
 proteasome.
 Chem
 Biol
 2006,
 13
 (6),
 
607-­‐14.
 
91.
  Janetka,
 J.
 W.;
 Raman,
 P.;
 Satyshur,
 K.;
 Flentke,
 G.
 R.;
 Rich,
 D.
 H.,
 Novel
 cyclic
 biphenyl
 
ether
 peptide
 beta-­‐strand
 mimetics
 and
 HIV-­‐protease
 inhibitors.
 Journal
 of
 the
 American
 
Chemical
 Society
 1997,
 119
 (2),
 441-­‐442.
 
92.
  Janetka,
 J.
 W.;
 Satyshur,
 K.
 A.;
 Rich,
 D.
 H.,
 A
 cyclic
 side-­‐chain-­‐linked
 biphenyl
 ether
 
tripeptide:
 H3N(+)-­‐cyclo-­‐[Phe(4-­‐O)Phe-­‐Phe(3-­‐O)]-­‐OMe.Cl.
 Acta
 Crystallogr
 C
 1996,
 52
 (
 Pt
 
12),
 3112-­‐4.
 
93.
  Muller,
 G.;
 Giera,
 H.,
 Protein
 secondary
 structure
 templates
 derived
 from
 bioactive
 natural
 
products.
 Combinatorial
 chemistry
 meets
 structure-­‐based
 design.
 J
 Comput
 Aided
 Mol
 Des
 
1998,
 12
 (1),
 1-­‐6.
 
94.
  Fehrentz,
 J.
 A.;
 Paris,
 M.;
 Heitz,
 A.;
 Velek,
 J.;
 Liu,
 C.
 F.;
 Winternitz,
 F.;
 Martinez,
 J.,
 Improved
 
Solid-­‐Phase
 Synthesis
 of
 C-­‐Terminal
 Peptide
 Aldehydes.
 Tetrahedron
 Letters
 1995,
 36
 (43),
 
7871-­‐7874.
 
95.
  Vergne,
 C.;
 BoisChoussy,
 M.;
 Ouazzani,
 J.;
 Beugelmans,
 R.;
 Zhu,
 J.
 P.,
 Chemoenzymatic
 
synthesis
 of
 enantiomerically
 pure
 4-­‐fluoro-­‐3-­‐nitro
 and
 3-­‐fluoro-­‐4-­‐nitro
 phenylalanine.
 
Tetrahedron-­‐Asymmetry
 1997,
 8
 (3),
 391-­‐398.
 
96.
  Boger,
 D.
 L.;
 Castle,
 S.
 L.;
 Miyazaki,
 S.;
 Wu,
 J.
 H.;
 Beresis,
 R.
 T.;
 Loiseleur,
 O.,
 Vancomycin
 CD
 
and
 DE
 Macrocyclization
 and
 Atropisomerism
 Studies.
 J
 Org
 Chem
 1999,
 64
 (1),
 70-­‐80.
 
97.
  Burgess,
 K.;
 Lim,
 D.;
 BoisChoussy,
 M.;
 Zhu,
 J.
 P.,
 Rapid
 and
 efficient
 solid
 phase
 syntheses
 of
 
cyclic
 peptides
 with
 endocyclic
 biaryl
 ether
 bonds.
 Tetrahedron
 Letters
 1997,
 38
 (19),
 3345-­‐
3348.
 

40
 

 

98.
  Elofsson,
 M.;
 Splittgerber,
 U.;
 Myung,
 J.;
 Mohan,
 R.;
 Crews,
 C.
 M.,
 Towards
 subunit-­‐specific
 
proteasome
 inhibitors:
 synthesis
 and
 evaluation
 of
 peptide
 alpha',beta'-­‐epoxyketones.
 
Chem
 Biol
 1999,
 6
 (11),
 811-­‐22.
 
99.
  Garrett,
 I.
 R.;
 Chen,
 D.;
 Gutierrez,
 G.;
 Zhao,
 M.;
 Escobedo,
 A.;
 Rossini,
 G.;
 Harris,
 S.
 E.;
 
Gallwitz,
 W.;
 Kim,
 K.
 B.;
 Hu,
 S.;
 Crews,
 C.
 M.;
 Mundy,
 G.
 R.,
 Selective
 inhibitors
 of
 the
 
osteoblast
 proteasome
 stimulate
 bone
 formation
 in
 vivo
 and
 in
 vitro.
 J
 Clin
 Invest
 2003,
 111
 
(11),
 1771-­‐82.
 
100.
 Appel,
 W.,
 Chymotrypsin:
 molecular
 and
 catalytic
 properties.
 Clin
 Biochem
 1986,
 19
 (6),
 
317-­‐22.
 
101.
 Cuerrier,
 D.;
 Moldoveanu,
 T.;
 Davies,
 P.
 L.,
 Determination
 of
 peptide
 substrate
 specificity
 
for
 mu-­‐calpain
 by
 a
 peptide
 library-­‐based
 approach:
 the
 importance
 of
 primed
 side
 
interactions.
 J
 Biol
 Chem
 2005,
 280
 (49),
 40632-­‐41.
 
102.
 Huang,
 L.;
 Lee,
 A.;
 Ellman,
 J.
 A.,
 Identification
 of
 potent
 and
 selective
 mechanism-­‐based
 
inhibitors
 of
 the
 cysteine
 protease
 cruzain
 using
 solid-­‐phase
 parallel
 synthesis.
 J
 Med
 Chem
 
2002,
 45
 (3),
 676-­‐84.
 
103.
 Gillmor,
 S.
 A.;
 Craik,
 C.
 S.;
 Fletterick,
 R.
 J.,
 Structural
 determinants
 of
 specificity
 in
 the
 
cysteine
 protease
 cruzain.
 Protein
 Sci
 1997,
 6
 (8),
 1603-­‐11.
 
104.
 Ferreira,
 R.
 S.;
 Simeonov,
 A.;
 Jadhav,
 A.;
 Eidam,
 O.;
 Mott,
 B.
 T.;
 Keiser,
 M.
 J.;
 McKerrow,
 J.
 
H.;
 Maloney,
 D.
 J.;
 Irwin,
 J.
 J.;
 Shoichet,
 B.
 K.,
 Complementarity
 between
 a
 docking
 and
 a
 
high-­‐throughput
 screen
 in
 discovering
 new
 cruzain
 inhibitors.
 J
 Med
 Chem
 2010,
 53
 (13),
 
4891-­‐905.
 
105.
 Nery,
 E.
 D.;
 Juliano,
 M.
 A.;
 Meldal,
 M.;
 Svendsen,
 I.;
 Scharfstein,
 J.;
 Walmsley,
 A.;
 Juliano,
 L.,
 
Characterization
 of
 the
 substrate
 specificity
 of
 the
 major
 cysteine
 protease
 (cruzipain)
 from
 
Trypanosoma
 cruzi
 using
 a
 portion-­‐mixing
 combinatorial
 library
 and
 fluorogenic
 peptides.
 
Biochem
 J
 1997,
 323
 (
 Pt
 2),
 427-­‐33.
 

 

41